Station Crew Gets Resupply Ship This Week

June 13, 2005

Expedition 11 is busy preparing for the arrival of a new Russian cargo spacecraft. The new Progress cargo ship will arrive at the International Space Station on June 18, bringing extra oxygen supplies and filters for a faulty Russian oxygen generator. Currently, the crew is burning oxygen generator candles inside the Station. Plenty of oxygen is available onboard the Station, since supplies are replenished with each visiting supply ship.

Commander Sergei Krikalev has lived and worked in space longer than any human except one – Cosmonaut Sergei Avdeyev. Krikalev will break Avdeyev’s record in August with his combined six missions, including one on the Mir Space Station and two on the ISS.

Meanwhile, Flight Engineer and NASA ISS Science Officer John Phillips has been participating in an experiment that measures muscle tone in the legs and feet. Researchers are studying bone and muscle loss in microgravity and how to counteract it on future long-duration space missions.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Researchers test health technology on zero gravity flights with NASA

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