Shuttle Cargo Ready for Return To Flight

Jun 15, 2005
Shuttle Cargo Ready for Return To Flight

The cargo for the Space Shuttle Discovery's historic Return to Flight mission (STS-114) arrived yesterday at Launch Pad 39-B at NASA's Kennedy Space Center, Fla.
Discovery's payload includes the Multi-Purpose Logistics Module Raffaello, the Lightweight Multi-Purpose Experiment Support Structure Carrier (LMC), and the External Stowage Platform-2 (ESP-2).

NASA's Italian-built Raffaello will carry 12 large racks filled with food, clothing, spare parts and research equipment to the International Space Station. Included in the cargo is the Human Research Facility-2 that will expand the Station's capability to support human life sciences research.

The LMC will deliver a Control Moment Gyroscope to replace an inoperable one that failed in August 2002. Gyroscopes provide attitude control for the Station keeping it properly oriented without use of rocket fuel.

A Thermal Protection System repair sample box containing pieces of the Shuttle's heat-shielding tile is also installed on the LMC. The samples will enable crew members to test new on-orbit repair techniques.

The ESP-2 will carry replacement parts to the Station. The platform will be deployed, attached to the Station's airlock, and serve as a permanent spare parts facility.

Returning the Shuttle to flight and completing the Space Station are the first steps in the Vision for Space Exploration, a stepping stone strategy toward new exploration goals. Using the Station to study human endurance and adaptation in space, and to test new technologies and techniques, NASA will be prepared for longer journeys on to the moon, Mars and beyond.

Discovery's Return to Flight mission is targeted for July 13 with a launch planning window that extends through July 31.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Ceres bright spots sharpen but questions remain

Related Stories

SpaceX cargo ship begins journey back to Earth (Update)

May 21, 2015

SpaceX's unmanned Dragon supply ship left the International Space Station Thursday and began its journey back to Earth where it will splash down in the Pacific Ocean off the coast of California, NASA said.

Four decades of tracking European spacecraft

May 19, 2015

Forty years ago this week, a satellite ground station in Spain became the first to be assigned to what would become ESA. Since then, the network – Estrack – has expanded worldwide and today employs cutting-edge ...

Sandia helps small security company thwart thieves

May 19, 2015

At a motorcycle shop on a busy city street, crooks devised an elaborate scheme to steal from the storage yard. They jumped the fence and unpacked some newly arrived bikes from crates. They used the crates ...

Recommended for you

Ceres bright spots sharpen but questions remain

20 hours ago

The latest views of Ceres' enigmatic white spots are sharper and clearer, but it's obvious that Dawn will have to descend much lower before we'll see crucial details hidden in this overexposed splatter of ...

What are extrasolar planets?

20 hours ago

For countless generations, human beings have looked out at the night sky and wondered if they were alone in the universe. With the discovery of other planets in our solar system, the true extent of the Milky ...

Rosetta's view of a comet's "great divide"

20 hours ago

The latest image to be revealed of comet 67P/Churyumov-Gerasimenko comes from October 27, 2014, before the Philae lander even departed for its surface. Above we get a view of a dramatically-shadowed cliff ...

How long will our spacecraft survive?

20 hours ago

There are many hazards out there, eager to disrupt and dismantle the mighty machines we send out into space. How long can they survive to perform their important missions?

Why roundworms are ideal for space studies

20 hours ago

Humans have long been fascinated by the cosmos. Ancient cave paintings show that we've been thinking about space for much of the history of our species. The popularity of recent sci-fi movies suggest that ...

A curious family of giant exoplanets

21 hours ago

There are 565 exoplanets currently known that are as massive as Jupiter or bigger, about one third of the total known, confirmed exoplanet population. About one quarter of the massive population orbits very ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.