Mercury Computer Systems Teams with IBM to Build Cell Processor-Based Systems

June 28, 2005

Agreement with IBM Intended to Put Revolutionary Cell Processor in Computer Systems for Defense, Life Sciences, Seismic, and Industrial Applications

Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. announced today that it will partner with IBM to integrate the Cell microprocessor technology to build new breakthrough computer systems for data-intensive applications. The company is the first outside of the gaming industry to use Cell microprocessor technology design services from IBM.

The alliance offers Mercury access to IBM's vast trove of technology capabilities through IBM's Engineering and Technology Services group. Mercury has initial plans to integrate the Cell microprocessor technology into a wide variety of future products, with the aim of dramatically boosting computing performance in Mercury's customer applications. By incorporating Cell technology, Mercury intends to take demanding applications such as radar, sonar, MRI, CT, digital X-ray, and others to a new level of sophistication and performance.

Mercury and engineers from IBM's Engineering and Technology Services unit will collaborate to develop products with dramatically improved performance for graphic-intensive workloads and computationally intensive applications. The optimized Cell-based products will be targeted at current and new applications in medical imaging, industrial inspection, aerospace and defense, seismic processing, and telecommunications. New sensor capabilities in these markets are dramatically increasing the volumes of available data to be processed. For example, applying the processing power of Cell technology in medical imaging can yield significant improvements in image quality - enabling earlier detection of diseases and potentially saving lives.

"The tremendous performance advantages afforded by the Cell processor will enable Mercury to address an even broader range of compute-intensive challenges for our customers," said Jay Bertelli, president and chief executive officer, Mercury Computer Systems, Inc. "Our relationship with IBM, a leader in advanced technologies, upholds Mercury's commitment to open innovation, in leveraging expertise within and outside of Mercury."


The Cell processor, developed by IBM, Toshiba and Sony Group, is a breakthrough architectural design featuring eight synergistic processing elements plus a Power Architecture™-based core that provides unmatched performance levels in many computationally intense applications. The Cell processor has peak performance in excess of 200 GFLOPS - which equates to 200 billion floating-point operations per second - as measured during initial hardware testing.

The IBM and Mercury initiative leverages the capabilities of IBM's Engineering and Technology Services organization, providing Mercury unique access to the Cell processor technology to augment Mercury's renowned engineering expertise. As a leading supplier of highly engineered and integrated computing solutions, Mercury remains focused on meeting the demands of its OEM customers with an evolving, comprehensive choice of products and services.

"We are pleased to partner with Mercury to develop leading-edge computing systems based on the revolutionary Cell architecture," said Raj S. Desai, vice president, IBM Engineering and Technology Services. "IBM and its world-class engineering team is dedicated to collaborating with innovative companies like Mercury to deliver the next generation of computing systems to benefit businesses around the globe."

Explore further: Venus

Related Stories

Venus

July 27, 2015

As the morning star, the evening star, and the brightest natural object in the sky (after the Moon), human beings have been aware of Venus since time immemorial. Even though it would be many thousands of years before it was ...

Metals used in high-tech products face future supply risks

March 27, 2015

In a new paper, a team of Yale researchers assesses the "criticality" of all 62 metals on the Periodic Table of Elements, providing key insights into which materials might become more difficult to find in the coming decades, ...

Scientists trace nanoparticles from plants to caterpillars

December 16, 2014

In one of the most comprehensive laboratory studies of its kind, Rice University scientists traced the uptake and accumulation of quantum dot nanoparticles from water to plant roots, plant leaves and leaf-eating caterpillars.

The geography of the global electronic waste burden

July 23, 2014

As local and national governments struggle to deal with ever-growing piles of electronic waste (or "e-waste"), scientists are now refining the picture of just how much there is and where it really ends up. Published in the ...

The science that stumped Einstein

July 1, 2014

In 1908, the physics world woke up to a puzzle whose layers have continued to stump the greatest scientists of the century ever since. That year, Dutch physicist Kamerlingh Onnes cooled mercury down to -450° Fahrenheit and ...

Recommended for you

Magnetism at nanoscale

August 3, 2015

As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials' behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are building a unique ...

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.