Elpida's 1.8 Volt, 256Mb Digital Consumer DRAM Delivers Lower Power Consumption for Handheld Applications

June 2, 2005

Elpida Memory, Inc., Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), announced a new 1.8 Volt, 256 Megabit SDRAM device suitable for use in battery-operated products such as digital still cameras, digital video cameras and other handheld applications that require lower power operation as well as higher density. The new devices also support a x32-bit configuration to deliver high-speed performance within a small form-factor package that minimizes board space. The new 1.8 Volt 256 Megabit SDRAM device provides a 50 percent reduction in power versus similar SDRAM products at 2.5 Volt operation.

The latest digital consumer electronics require a higher density, higher speed DRAM to power advanced multimedia functions," said Jun Kitano, director of Technical Marketing at Elpida Memory (USA). "Elpida's x32-bit 256 Megabit Digital Consumer DRAM delivers the bandwidth needed for next-generation handheld devices and its 1.8 volt operation significantly extends battery life and meets the restricted space requirements demanded by customers in the consumer electronics space."

Elpida's 256 Megabit Digital Consumer SDRAM - Technical Details:

Elpida's 256 Megabit SDRAM devices (Part numbers: EDS2532EEBH-**-E; EDS2532JEBH-**-E) are organized as 8M words x 32-bits and support 1.8 Volt or 2.5 Volt operation, respectively, and they operate at frequencies up to 166 MHz. The 256 Megabit SDRAM devices are produced using advanced 0.10-micron process technology and are available in FBGA packages or as a bare die suitable for use in System-in-Package (SiP) or Multi-Chip Package (MCP) designs.

Elpida's 256 Megabit SDRAM devices (Part numbers: EDS2532EEBH-**-E; EDS2532JEBH-**-E) will be available as samples in June 2005. Volume is anticipated for September 2005.

Explore further: Elpida Memory's 512 Megabit Mobile RAM Device Fits in Smaller Package for 3G Phones

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