Elpida Memory Develops 2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM Using 80 nm Process Technology for Servers

June 23, 2005

Industry's Highest Density DRAM Product Will Use the Smallest, Most Advanced Process Technology for High Volume Production

Elpida Memory, Inc., Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced that it has completed the development of a 2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM device, the first to use its 80 nm process technology. This advanced process technology will enable volume support of high-speed DDR2 SDRAM, such as DDR2-800 for next-generation, high-performance computing applications.

Elpida's leading-edge 80 nm process technology features advanced layout, circuitry and design. It also utilizes an ArF scanner, an advanced lithography technology, which is key in the development of advanced process technology.

"Elpida always remains focused on its ability to deliver high-performance DRAM products that utilize advanced process technology," said Yukio Sakamoto, president and CEO of Elpida Memory. "2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM is the highest density DRAM device available in the industry, and our ability to establish its development at 80 nm demonstrates our readiness to support high-speed products, such as DDR2-800, that are required by the high-performance computing market."

Elpida's 2 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM at 80 nm will provide advantages including high-speed performance — a necessary element for high-performance DRAM products such as DDR2-800 — as well as reduced operating current. The device will also maintain the same operating current as a 1 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM device therefore, providing double the density without an increase in power requirements. This feature offers superior system performance in terms of both power and thermal design.

The advanced 80 nm process technology also allows die to be packaged in 68-ball FBGA packages that can be stacked and mounted on a JEDEC-standard (30 mm height) registered Dual In-Line Memory Module (DIMM) or on a Fully-Buffered DIMM (FB-DIMM) at 30.35 mm height. This flexibility will allow Elpida to realize 4 Gigabyte and 8 Gigabyte density DDR2 modules. These modules will allow high-end computing systems such as mission critical database servers, to utilize the benefits of a 2 Gigabit-based DRAM solution without compromising system performance.

Volume production is expected to begin by the end of this fiscal year in accordance with market demand. Pricing for these products will be based on market conditions at that time.

Explore further: World's most efficient AES crypto processing technology for IoT devices developed

Related Stories

Flood forecasting gets major upgrade

August 25, 2016

The recent floods in Louisiana have reminded the nation of the devastation these disasters can cause, resulting in more than a dozen deaths and damaging more than 40,000 homes. David Maidment, a civil engineering researcher ...

Diet and back pain: What's the link?

August 23, 2016

Can a diet high in processed fat and sugar and Type 2 diabetes cause degeneration of intervertebral discs in the spine? If so, what is happening, and can it be prevented? As part of an ongoing collaboration between Rensselaer ...

3-D printed structures that 'remember' their shapes

August 26, 2016

Engineers from MIT and Singapore University of Technology and Design (SUTD) are using light to print three-dimensional structures that "remember" their original shapes. Even after being stretched, twisted, and bent at extreme ...

Recommended for you

The rise and fall of galaxy formation

August 30, 2016

An international team of astronomers, including Carnegie's Eric Persson, has charted the rise and fall of galaxies over 90 percent of cosmic history. Their work, which includes some of the most sensitive astronomical measurements ...

Defend or grow? These plants do both

August 30, 2016

From natural ecosystems to farmers' fields, plants face a dilemma of energy use: outgrow and outcompete their neighbors for light, or defend themselves against insects and disease.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.