Physical Science Experiment Conducted on Space Station

May 27, 2005

Expedition 11 NASA Space Station Science Officer John Phillips began working with the Fluid Merging Viscosity, or FMVM experiment this week. This physical science experiment is studying viscosity -- a property of fluids that causes them to resist flowing because of the internal friction created as the molecules move against each other. Understanding the viscosity of fluids is important for everything from designing laboratory experiments to industrial production of materials.

One way to determine viscosity is to measure how long it takes two spheres of liquid to merge into a single spherical drop. Phillips used honey with two different viscosities and released multiple drops of the honey from a syringe onto strings. Digital images of the drops were recorded as they joined to form one drop.

Researchers hope data from FMVM will provide insight into the behavior of glasses -- materials that may be used to fabricate parts or equipment for long-term space missions and improve future materials processing experiments carried out in space and on Earth.

Source: NASA

Explore further: Team finds the 'key' to quantum network solution

Related Stories

Humble neutron is valuable tool in geology

Mar 16, 2015

With the ability to analyse the properties of the Earth's internal components to the atomic scale in conditions only found kilometres below our feet, recent studies have allowed geoscientists to study our ...

Recommended for you

Defining a national standard for dynamic pressure waves

3 hours ago

In recent years, the physical damage done by pressure waves – such as traumatic brain injuries from explosives sustained by military personnel in the Middle East – has become an increasingly urgent public ...

Shedding light on untapped information in photons

4 hours ago

Conventional optical imaging systems today largely limit themselves to the measurement of light intensity, providing two-dimensional renderings of three-dimensional scenes and ignoring significant amounts ...

The art of hand-polishing precision optics

6 hours ago

Growing up in a household of artists and engineers, Peter Thelin was destined for a career in which artistry mattered. Only for him, art has come in the form of manipulating the shapes, sizes and qualities of optics. And ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.