Micron Demonstrates Leading Imaging Technology with Industry's First 1.7-Micron Pixel CMOS Sensor

May 16, 2005

Micron Technology, Inc., today publicly demonstrated functionality of the industry’s first 1.7-micron (µm) pixel image sensor at Imaging Sensor 2005, a technical symposium organized by Nikkei Electronics in Tokyo, Japan.

“Today’s demonstration of 1.7µm pixel technology validates Micron’s ability to deliver leading imaging technology and products,” said Hisayuki Suzuki, Micron’s Senior Director of Marketing for Imaging. “Shrinking pixel size enables mobile and consumer applications with higher resolution and smaller form factors resulting in an enhanced picture taking experience. Additionally, smaller pixel size facilitates increased features in other target applications, such as medical, biometrics and high-speed.”

As with all Micron image sensors, the 1.7µm pixel sensor incorporates DigitalClarity™ technology, differentiating Micron’s image sensors from competitors’ products by providing superior low light performance, color fidelity, dynamic range, high temperature performance and high frame rates. These key performance features deliver image quality benefits to customers across platforms, especially those customers targeting low light and high speed usage conditions.

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