Elpida's 512 Megabyte DDR2 SO-DIMMs Offer Low-Power Operation, Improved Thermal Performance for Notebooks

May 24, 2005

Elpida Memory, Inc., Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced its 512 Megabyte DDR2 Small-Outline Dual In-line Memory Modules (SO-DIMMs). The modules utilize next-generation 512 Megabit DDR2 SDRAM devices that realize a 30% reduction in IDD0 current (155mA to 110mA) compared to previous generation devices to achieve lower-power operation, improved thermal performance and extended battery life in portable applications including notebooks.

Elpida's 512 Megabyte, low-power, small-outline modules are based on DDR2 SDRAM devices with a reduced operating current," said Jun Kitano, director of Technical Marketing for Elpida Memory (USA). "Therefore, our SO-DIMMs meet customer demand for better thermals-an essential characteristic for notebooks where board space is a premium and extended battery life is crucial."

Elpida's 512 Megabyte SO-DIMMs - Technical Details:

Elpida 512 Megabyte DDR2 SO-DIMMs (Part numbers: EBE52UD6AFSA-6E-E: PC2-5300, EBE52UD6AFSA-5C-E: PC2-4200, EBE52UD6AFSA-4A-E: PC2-3200) are available in three speed grades, DDR2-667 (CL=5-5-5), DDR2-533 (CL=4-4-4) and DDR2-400 (CL=3-3-3) respectively, and they are organized as 64M words x 64-bits x 2 Ranks. The modules are composed of 8 pieces of x16 512 Megabit DDR2 SDRAM produced using 100 nm process and assembled in 200-pin JEDEC-standard packages. The devices mounted on modules have a 1.8 Volt operation and a burst length of 4 or 8.

Elpida 512 Megabyte DDR2 SO-DIMMs (Part numbers: EBE52UD6AFSA-6E-E, EBE52UD6AFSA-5C-E, EBE52UD6AFSA-4A-E) are currently available in samples. Volume production is expected in July 2005.

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