First Nano Grows Ultra-Long High Purity Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

April 4, 2005
First Nano Grows Ultra-Long High Purity Aligned Carbon Nanotubes

First Nano grows high-density vertically aligned carbon nanotubes over 1 mm long.
First Nano today announced that lab experiments with the EasyTube 2000 System has proven to grow high purity, vertically aligned carbon nanotubes (CNT) over 1 mm long, on silicon substrate using an iron thin film catalyst. The fully automated, high-throughput EasyTube 2000 System is a chemical vapor deposition tool for the synthesis of nanotubes and other nanoscale materials.

"Our system has demonstrated the ability to grow ultra-long and controllable diameter nanotubes,” said Dr. Yi Tu, Principal Research Scientist with First Nano. “The value that these densely formed ultra-long nanoscale strands offers is application development that can be used for composite materials strengthening, rechargeable batteries, filtration systems and electronic devices.”

The process development for growing CNTs is part of a solution package that First Nano offers to customers, and is embedded in preprogrammed recipes in the EasyTube System.

First Nano's website: www.firstnano.com/

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