Motorola Labs Launched in India

April 8, 2005

Motorola today announced the launch of Motorola Labs India with the official opening of an applied research lab in Bangalore. This lab, the 11th for Motorola and the company’s first in India, augments Motorola’s existing India R&D infrastructure of more than 1700 software engineers.

The mandate of Motorola Labs in India is to engage in applied research in the areas of converged networks, autonomic networking, enterprise applications and embedded systems and physical sciences. This research focus supports Motorola’s vision of Seamless Mobility: easy, un-interrupted access to information, entertainment, communication, monitoring and control.

The Lab in India was launched by Ms. Padmasree Warrior, executive vice president and chief technology officer. Accompanying her was Mr. Anson Chen, corporate vice president of Motorola’s Global Software Group and Mr. Amit Sharma, vice president, regional management, south & south-east Asia.

Speaking on this occasion, Ms. Warrior said, “Motorola Labs’ India research centre joins the Labs’ global team in creating the technology, applications and the unifying architecture to realize Motorola’s vision of Seamless Mobility. This Lab reflects our commitment to grow India as a strategic R&D hub for engineering and product development.”

Ms. Warrior added, “With access to India’s proven best-in-class scientific and engineering talent and the ability to collaborate with world-class universities and institutes, Motorola believes India is the ideal market for applied research and software development.”

Speaking on the timing of the launch, Mr. Sharma said “The launch is topical, given our customer base in India, increasing access to partnerships and a growing supplier ecosystem. Co-location with Motorola product engineering (also at Bangalore) ensures strong technology transfer to Motorola’s networks, global software and mobile devices groups”. In addition to its global research mission, this lab will develop an understanding of the unique complexities and nuances of the Indian market and interpret Motorola's Seamless Mobility vision specifically for India.

Motorola’s R&D investment in India has grown this year to US$85 million in technology and R&D, up from approximately $50 million in 2002. It plans to grow this investment by 10-20% per year. Motorola opened its first R&D facility in India in 1991.

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