Britain's top climatologist backs global warming claims

March 28, 2005

One of Britain's leading climate change experts has thrown his weight behind the claim that global warming is being caused by human activity in a report published today by the Institute of Physics.
The report by Professor Alan Thorpe, who takes up his post as chief of the Natural Environmental Research Council next month, aims to tackle sceptics who doubt the models scientists use to predict future climate change.

Professor Thorpe outlines the scientific basis for climate change and explains how the climate models actually predict future change. According to Thorpe, "uncertainty" is one of the key issues in predicting climate change but is an aspect of the research which is very poorly understood by the public and policy-makers.

In the report, Professor Thorpe says: "Science in crucial in determining government and international policy on climate change but only some of the views on this issue are actually supported by the scientific models".

"There is little doubt that a lack of knowledge about how climate change is predicted and the associated uncertainties are the main reason that there is so much ill-informed comment on climate change in the media and amoung the public".

The report, 'Climate Change Prediction: a challenging scientific problem' by Alan J. Thorpe, Professor of Meteorology at the University of Reading was published today by the Institute of Physics and is devoted to de-mystifying the prediction methodology, and focuses on the scientific basis of climate change prediction.

The Institute of Physics hopes that the paper will increase believability in climate models and persuade sceptics that human activity is likely to be causing global warming. The paper aims to convince policy-makers, the general public and the scientific community that the threats posed by global climate change are real.

A copy of the paper can be downloaded from: policy.iop.org/Policy/HE/index.html

Source: Institute of Physics

Explore further: The 'mini ice age' hoopla is a giant failure of science communication

Related Stories

The impact of climate change in Ecuador's Andean mountains

July 23, 2015

The lakes of El Cajas National Park, located at 4,000 metres high in Ecuador's Azuay province, are the scene of fieldwork carried out by the research project ECUAFLUX, an initiative to analyse the carbon cycle in the Andean ...

Project brings more eyes to climate change

July 22, 2015

The options for how to spend your free time are almost endless, whether it's working out at the gym, curling up with a good book, or relaxing in front of the TV. But have you ever considered taking part in scientific research?

The ecology of the future and the future of ecology

July 21, 2015

Biologists in North Carolina are trying to get a glimpse of the future through a project designed to shed light on how rising temperatures will affect the insects and microbial life that play critical roles in the environment. ...

Recommended for you

'Expansion entropy': A new litmus test for chaos?

July 28, 2015

Can the flap of a butterfly's wings in Brazil set off a tornado in Texas? This intriguing hypothetical scenario, commonly called "the butterfly effect," has come to embody the popular conception of a chaotic system, in which ...

'Carbon sink' detected underneath world's deserts

July 28, 2015

The world's deserts may be storing some of the climate-changing carbon dioxide emitted by human activities, a new study suggests. Massive aquifers underneath deserts could hold more carbon than all the plants on land, according ...

Lobster-Eye imager detects soft X-ray emissions

July 28, 2015

Solar winds are known for powering dangerous space weather events near Earth, which, in turn, endangers space assets. So a large interdisciplinary group of researchers, led by the U.S. National Aeronautics and Space Administration ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.