Texas Instruments Fuels Development of Mobile Entertainment Applications for 3G Mobile Phones

February 10, 2005

Custom ring tones, 3D games, high-quality video and digital TV are only a few of the exciting revenue generating applications fueling the growth of 3G cellular technology. Together with members of its OMAPTM Developer Network, Texas Instruments Incorporated (TI) [NYSE: TXN] is creating compelling "living-room quality" mobile entertainment applications that will propel 3G to become a high-volume, high-revenue industry for mobile operators. 3G mobile entertainment applications such as video and 3D gaming take advantage of key characteristics in operators´ 3G networks and devices including more processing power, richer software and low-latency, high-throughput data bandwidth.

With an integrated imaging and video accelerator, a 2D/3D graphics accelerator, an audio engine, sophisticated power management functions and more, TI´s OMAP2420 processor enables a fun, personal and entertaining multimedia experience on the mobile phone, without sacrificing battery-life, voice performance or other functions consumers have come to expect. With a hardware-based security solution, TI´s OMAP2420 also provides the basis for a secure environment for the protection of digital rights management that does not expose valuable content for unlicensed copying and distribution. Meeting consumers´, operators´ and content providers´ expectations for a secure, state-of-the-art mobile entertainment experience without negatively affecting performance will be a strong step toward making trendy mobile features ´must-have,´ revenue-generating 3G services.

"TI's OMAP platform is driving 3G mobile entertainment today on NTT DoCoMo FOMA phones providing gaming, high-quality video, stereo audio and more. Integrating the OMAP 2 architecture within our jointly developed UMTS chipset, NTT DoCoMo anticipates further innovation in consumer electronics quality multimedia and entertainment thanks to the processing power of the OMAP 2 platform," said Koji Chiba, vice president and managing director of customer equipment, Development Department, NTT DoCoMo, Inc.

Members of TI's OMAP Developer Network are at the forefront of mobile entertainment applications innovation, ensuring that consumers can enjoy the latest 3D games, watch high-definition video and listen to their favorite music in stereo on their mobile phone. TI and its OMAP developers are enabling device manufacturers to quickly deliver compelling new applications which allow operators to deploy rich, new services to increase revenue. This TI-developer cooperation also provides the processing power necessary for content providers to enable full-featured content to run on mobile phones without sacrificing neither battery life nor the gaming experience that users have with their home systems.

At 3GSM in the TI booth B6 in Hall 1, select OMAP Developer Network members will be on hand to exhibit the power of the OMAP 2 architecture using the OMAP2420 in their demonstrations. Aplix, Esmertec, Fathammer, HI Corporation, Ideaworks3D and Superscape will be showcasing 3D gaming; PacketVideo will demonstrate digital TV; Ingenient will display digital TV, video, audio and other multimedia applications; Beatnik and Emuzed will demonstrate multimedia applications including audio, video and more; and ACCESS will showcase full Internet browser capabilities on a mobile phone.

Explore further: Mobile software simplifies measurements of gel electrophoresis

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