Mitsubishi Launches Mini DLP Pocket Projector

February 10, 2005

Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America’s Presentation Products Division, the industry leader in home entertainment projector technology and innovation, today introduced its PocketProjector™, one of the world’s smallest LED projectors. Weighing just 14 ounces and fitting easily into the palm of a hand or a coat pocket, the tiny projector is built for fun and creative applications. It can be battery powered or used with a universal car adapter for truly mobile video on the fly.

The PocketProjector has one of the shortest projection distances of any mobile projector on the market today: Users can easily create a 20-inch diagonal screen with only a little over a foot of projection distance, and a 40-inch screen image in less than a yard. With a special suggested retail launch price of $699, the affordable PocketProjector is the next must-have gadget, and the coolest gift for 2005.

“For digital cameras, handheld gaming and portable DVD players, the PocketProjector is the newest display tool or toy of choice,” said James Chan, director, projector product marketing for Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America. “This projector can go where no projector has gone before. Just imagine being able to whip out a big screen from your coat pocket – people are going to have so much fun with it.”

The PocketProjector powers on or off instantly for quick and easy start-up, and can display images from a notebook computer, portable DVD player, and gaming consoles for immediate use almost anywhere. It is lighted by three Lumileds™ LEDs (red, green, blue) that produce an SVGA (800 x 600 pixels) image formed digitally by the latest DLP™ chip by Texas Instruments. The projector’s advanced lighting technology is rated to last an unprecedented 20,000 hours; with an average use of five hours per day, the lamp is expected to last over 10 years.

The PocketProjector will ship with a protective slip cover and AC power cord. Mitsubishi also plans to offer Convenience Packs with suggested retail prices from $199, which will contain application-specific cables, accessories and small screens for consumer and industry segments. An optional extra battery base will be available for a suggested retail price of $149.

“Our new PocketProjector is one of the most advanced products I’ve seen in a long time,” said Aki Ninomiya, vice president, Mitsubishi Digital Electronics America. “It establishes new standards and creates all new applications and markets for projection displays.”

Pricing and Availability
Mitsubishi’s new PocketProjector will be available in July 2005 through online retailers and major retail channels at a suggested retail price of $699. Optional battery pack and Convenience Packs will also be made available upon release of the projector.

Related Stories

Recommended for you

Microsoft describes hard-to-mimic authentication gesture

August 1, 2015

Photos. Messages. Bank account codes. And so much more—sit on a person's mobile device, and the question is, how to secure them without having to depend on lengthy password codes of letters and numbers. Vendors promoting ...

Netherlands bank customers can get vocal on payments

August 1, 2015

Are some people fed up with remembering and using passwords and PINs to make it though the day? Those who have had enough would prefer to do without them. For mobile tasks that involve banking, though, it is obvious that ...

Model shows how surge in wealth inequality may be reversed

July 30, 2015

(Phys.org)—For many Americans, the single biggest problem facing the country is the growing wealth inequality. Based on income tax data, wealth inequality in the US has steadily increased since the mid-1980s, with the top ...

A cataclysmic event of a certain age

July 27, 2015

At the end of the Pleistocene period, approximately 12,800 years ago—give or take a few centuries—a cosmic impact triggered an abrupt cooling episode that earth scientists refer to as the Younger Dryas.

New blow for 'supersymmetry' physics theory

July 27, 2015

In a new blow for the futuristic "supersymmetry" theory of the universe's basic anatomy, experts reported fresh evidence Monday of subatomic activity consistent with the mainstream Standard Model of particle physics.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.