Sunspot Creates a Stir; Auroras Likely

Jan 19, 2005
Sunspot Creates a Stir; Auroras Likely

Beyond the winter chill that many of us have to contend with, there's also stormy space weather in the forecast for the week.
A fast-growing sunspot group designated AR 10720 has been causing a stir as it sent a series of coronal mass ejections, or CMEs, hurtling through space at breakneck speed. The large blast on Monday was classified as X-3, with "X" being the most powerful designation, followed by the degree of severity. Scientists expect the charged radiation from that event to reach Earth Tuesday night or Wednesday.

Image: This view of the Sun from the Solar and Heliospheric Observatory shows a lot of the active regions. For more, check the web site. Credit: NASA/ESA

That same sunspot region launched the fastest CME ever observed toward Earth, traveling at 2,890 km per second (1,796 miles per second). It was slowed down en route, arriving about 38 hours later. At its original speed it would have reached us in 18 hours and would have set another record for arrival. Auroras from that blast were observed in Alaska, Minnesota and as far south as Maryland.

The CME's ionized particles could interfere with power grids and satellite operations depending on the orientation of its magnetic field. If the field points south, the CME particles will interact with Earth's magnetosphere and likely disrupt electrical processes; if it points north, the magnetosphere should mostly shield the Earth from disruptions. Scientists will be unable to determine the orientation until the CME reaches the Advanced Composition Explorer (ACE) satellite in Earth orbit. This won't happen until only 15 minutes before the CME reaches Earth.

Dramatic solar activity is getting increasingly rare as we enter into the quiet period of the Sun's eleven-year cycle of activity. The years 2000-2001 marked the highest point of activity, but that doesn't preclude the occasional surprise like last week's CMEs and aurora. Even more significant were the intense solar storms that raged about a year ago.

Source: NASA (by Rachel A. Weintraub)

Explore further: Large Hubble survey confirms link between mergers and supermassive black holes with relativistic jets

Related Stories

Sun experiences seasonal changes, new research finds

Apr 07, 2015

The Sun undergoes a type of seasonal variability with its activity waxing and waning over the course of nearly two years, according to a new study by a team of researchers led by the National Center for Atmospheric ...

Dazzled by the bright Southern Lights

Mar 20, 2015

The past week saw a fantastic treat for aurora watchers. Generally it is the southern part of the country, Tasmania in particular, that sees the most impressive displays. But this aurora has been so intense ...

Green and red auroras light up St. Patrick's day dawn

Mar 18, 2015

A strong G3 geomagetic storm surged across the planet this morning producing a spectacular display of the northern lights. Some of you may who may have risen to see the new nova were no doubt as surprised ...

Recommended for you

NASA telescopes set limits on space-time quantum 'foam'

2 hours ago

A team of scientists has used X-ray and gamma-ray observations of some of the most distant objects in the universe to better understand the nature of space and time. Their results set limits on the quantum ...

Shining message about the end of the Dark Ages

4 hours ago

An international team, including researchers from the Centre for Astronomy of Heidelberg University (ZAH), has discovered three "cosmic Methusalems" from the earliest years of the universe. These unusual stars are about 13 ...

The kinematics of merging galaxies

5 hours ago

The unprecedented sensitivity of space telescopes has powered a revolution over the past decade in our understanding of galaxies in the young universe during its first billion years of existence. These primitive ...

User comments : 0

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.