IBM and Chartered Extend Technology Development Agreement to 45 Nanometer

January 24, 2005

IBM and Chartered Semiconductor Manufacturing today announced they have signed an extension to their existing technology agreement, formally expanding their joint development efforts to 45-nanometer (nm) bulk CMOS process technology. Upon the completion of the development, the two companies will have created a common process platform spanning three major generations of advanced process technology.

The 45nm alliance builds on the multi-year agreement that the two companies signed in November 2002 to jointly develop and align on 90nm and 65nm logic processes for process-exact foundry chip production on 300-millimeter (mm) silicon wafers. It extends the development relationship through June 2008. Financial details of the agreement were not disclosed.

"The original agreement between IBM and Chartered provides a broad foundry base for leading-edge technologies to help customers improve their time to market, reduce costs and increase their overall competitiveness," said Dr. Douglas Grose, General Manager, Technology Development and Manufacturing, IBM. "The extension of the joint development to 45nm reflects the confidence we have in Chartered's expertise as evidenced in the current development program and readiness of Fab 7 to support our mutual customers."

"As we broaden and deepen our joint development relationship with IBM for leading-edge process technology, we provide our customers with a roadmap that is positioned to keep them competitive through a common process platform that scales to 45nm design. We are confident that the combined depth of technical expertise and the proven business model the IBM-Chartered relationship offers will translate into an even more attractive long-term solution for many customers," said Dr. Shi-Chung "SC" Sun, senior vice president of technology development at Chartered. "Under the original agreement, IBM and Chartered have demonstrated the benefits that customers can derive from the technology and the collaborative business model. We are now poised to scale the relationship to the cutting edge of technology development."

As with the previous nodes, the development activities will be conducted at the IBM East Fishkill facility. Each company will have the ability to implement the jointly developed and copy-exact processes in its own manufacturing facilities, providing customers with a seamless multi-foundry strategy.

Explore further: Computing at full capacity

Related Stories

Computing at full capacity

August 2, 2015

Over 12 million servers in 3 million data centers in the U.S. burn about 100 billion kilowatt-hours of electricity every year. Billions of dollars are spent on data center energy every year, with billions more spent on power ...

Researchers announce another 5G breakthrough

July 31, 2015

'This breakthrough is very exciting for us. In just six months we have developed a truly unique demonstration which is able to use standard IP end-points and translate the IP flow into an IP-over-ICN abstraction (publish/subscribe ...

Recommended for you

Magnetism at nanoscale

August 3, 2015

As the demand grows for ever smaller, smarter electronics, so does the demand for understanding materials' behavior at ever smaller scales. Physicists at the U.S. Department of Energy's Ames Laboratory are building a unique ...

How the finch changes its tune

August 3, 2015

Like top musicians, songbirds train from a young age to weed out errors and trim variability from their songs, ultimately becoming consistent and reliable performers. But as with human musicians, even the best are not machines. ...

Study calculates the speed of ice formation

August 3, 2015

Researchers at Princeton University have for the first time directly calculated the rate at which water crystallizes into ice in a realistic computer model of water molecules. The simulations, which were carried out on supercomputers, ...

Small tilt in magnets makes them viable memory chips

August 3, 2015

University of California, Berkeley, researchers have discovered a new way to switch the polarization of nanomagnets, paving the way for high-density storage to move from hard disks onto integrated circuits.

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.