Elpida Memory Develops 90 nm Silicon Wafer Process for High-Performance DDR2 SDRAM

December 4, 2004

Advanced Process Technology Boosts Production Efficiency for Superior DDR2 Products

Elpida Memory, Inc., Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced that is has developed its new 90 nm production process for high-performance DRAM products. 90 nm (or 0.09 micron) is the next-generation measurement for silicon wafer manufacturing, following 100 nm (or 0.10 micron). It will allow more silicon chips to be produced on a single wafer because the size of each chip is smaller, and it improves overall production efficiency. Elpida's 90 nm process technology will first be applied to the production of high-performance 512 Megabit and 1 Gigabit DDR2 SDRAM products starting next year.

"Each transition to a smaller process geometry is no easy task and involves development of the process, followed by development of a new device design, and finally production using the new process and design together," said Yukio Sakamoto, president of Elpida Memory, Inc. "Elpida has verified this new 90 nm process technology and demonstrated high production yields equivalent to that of our currently mass produced 100 nm-based devices. During mass production, we anticipate an increase in productivity by 20% or more from our new 90 nm production process."

Elpida's 90 nm Process Technology

Elpida is using the same KrF optical lithography - with a wavelength of 248 nm - that is used for current mass production of 100 nm devices in its new 90 nm lines. Combined with the use of Optical Proximity Correction (OPC) the new process refines and reduces the geometric size of the memory cell and its peripherals by 90% while maintaining high production yields. The defect level defining the yield in production of the new 90 nm process has been confirmed to be as low as that of Elpida's mass-produced 100 nm process.

Elpida also implements an original silicide contact technology. With the 90 nm process, the geometry of the contact hole for the connecting nodes in the circuitry also becomes smaller. Consequently, this introduces additional resistance around the circuitry and impacts the speed performance. By introducing this silicidation technology, this problem has been greatly reduced, enabling DDR2 SDRAM to achieve speed performances on the order of 667 Mbps, 800 Mbps and beyond.

Explore further: Elpida Memory Begins Mass Production of DDR2 SDRAM Using 0.10-micron Process Technology

Related Stories

Japan's once-mighty tech industry has flagged

October 19, 2012

In the 1980s, Sony co-founder Akio Morita fired a verbal missile across the Pacific at Silicon Valley: Japan's supremacy in business and technology would overwhelm U.S. competitors and lead to America's decline.

Elpida Memory develops resistance RAM prototype

January 24, 2012

Elpida Memory, the world's third largest Dynamic Random Access Memory ("DRAM") manufacturer, today announced the development of its first-ever high-speed non-volatile resistance memory (ReRAM) prototype. As the ReRAM prototype ...

Elpida develops 1600 Mbps 4-gigabit DDR3 mobile RAM (LPDDR3)

November 24, 2011

Elpida Memory, Dynamic Random Access Memory ("DRAM") manufacturer, today announced that it has developed an advanced 30nm process 4-gigabit DDR3 Mobile RAMTM (LPDDR3). The new chip can achieve a high-speed data transfer rate ...

Elpida develops next-generation mobile DRAM product

November 18, 2011

Elpida Memory, the third largest Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM) manufacturer in the world, today announced that it had developed the industry's first 4-gigabit next-generation mobile memory chips for smart phones, tablet ...

Recommended for you

Global index proposed to avoid delays on climate policies

August 4, 2015

Professor David Frame, Director of Victoria's Climate Change Research Institute (CCRI), has co-authored a paper published today in the high profile international scientific journal Nature Climate Change. The paper argues ...

Study explores nanoscale structure of thin films

August 4, 2015

The world's newest and brightest synchrotron light source—the National Synchrotron Light Source II (NSLS-II) at the U.S. Department of Energy's Brookhaven National Laboratory—has produced one of the first publications ...

Tracking a mysterious group of asteroid outcasts

August 4, 2015

High above the plane of our solar system, near the asteroid-rich abyss between Mars and Jupiter, scientists have found a unique family of space rocks. These interplanetary oddballs are the Euphrosyne (pronounced you-FROH-seh-nee) ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.