SiGen Granted Key Strained-Silicon Substrate Patent

October 4, 2004

Silicon Genesis Corporation (SiGen) announced today that it has received a key patent in the area of fabricating strained silicon and silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates using a layer transfer process used in next-generation high-speed and low-power semiconductor applications.

The patent (US patent # 6,790,747) issued on September 14, 2004.

The technology covered by the patent utilizes SiGen's proprietary layer-transfer technologies to transfer a film of stressed silicon onto a target substrate with exceptional quality and efficiency. In prior strained silicon technologies, the silicon film is stressed through its epitaxial growth onto a relaxed silicon-germanium layer. Limitations that have kept this technology from mainstream adoption and use include the continued presence of germanium in the substrate and high device film defect levels. The new patented process uses a layer transfer method to mount a film of strained silicon onto a target substrate. The resulting substrate is free of germanium and defect levels can be reduced through donor process optimization. The process is also flexible in allowing either strained-silicon films to be transferred on a silicon substrate (resulting in a strained silicon-on-silicon or sSi-on-Si) or onto an oxidized substrate for making a strained-SOI or s-SOI substrate. The low-temperature processing inherent in the method also limits the germanium diffusion and defect propagation effects present in other higher-temperature methods.

Francois J. Henley, President and CEO of Silicon Genesis, said, "We are pleased with the grant of this patent that covers sSi-on-Si and s-SOI structures fabricated using layer-transfer processes. This is an important addition to our Intellectual Property portfolio of patents and process know-how in this quickly expanding field of engineered substrates. Coupled with our high-yield layer-transfer process and our new uniaxial strain technology, this new capability will allow SiGen to offer the best solutions for manufacturing next-generation engineered substrates. We believe that these structures will be utilized in mainstream next-generation semiconductor applications."

This latest patent brings SiGen's U.S. issued patents at over 75. Together with industry-leading layer-transfer process know-how, SiGen is offering a full spectrum of layer-transferred engineered substrate process and manufacturing solutions to the electronic, MEMS, and photonic industries.

Explore further: Low-cost wafers for solar cells

Related Stories

Low-cost wafers for solar cells

October 1, 2015

Silicon wafers are the heart of solar cells. However, manufacturing them is not cheap. Over 50 percent of the pure silicon used is machined into dust. A new manufacturing technique developed by Fraunhofer researchers puts ...

Physicists map the strain in wonder material graphene

September 29, 2015

This week, an international group of scientists is reporting a breakthrough in the effort to characterize the properties of graphene noninvasively while acquiring information about its response to structural strain.

A different type of 2-D semiconductor

September 25, 2015

To the growing list of two-dimensional semiconductors, such as graphene, boron nitride, and molybdenum disulfide, whose unique electronic properties make them potential successors to silicon in future devices, you can now ...

Recommended for you

Horn of Africa drying ever faster as climate warms

October 9, 2015

The Horn of Africa has become increasingly arid in sync with the global and regional warming of the last century and at a rate unprecedented in the last 2,000 years, according to new research led by a University of Arizona ...

Scientists paint quantum electronics with beams of light

October 9, 2015

A team of scientists from the University of Chicago and the Pennsylvania State University have accidentally discovered a new way of using light to draw and erase quantum-mechanical circuits in a unique class of materials ...

A mission to a metal world—The Psyche mission

October 9, 2015

In their drive to set exploration goals for the future, NASA's Discovery Program put out the call for proposals for their thirteenth Discovery mission in February 2014. After reviewing the 27 initial proposals, a panel of ...

What are white holes?

October 9, 2015

Black holes are created when stars die catastrophically in a supernova. So what in the universe is a white hole?

Could 'The Day After Tomorrow' happen?

October 9, 2015

A researcher from the University of Southampton has produced a scientific study of the climate scenario featured in the disaster movie 'The Day After Tomorrow'.


Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.