MOSFET Technology with Zero-Voltage and Zero-Current Transitions

September 3, 2004
SuperFREDMesh Technology

STMicroelectronics has introduced an n-channel MOSFET for use in HID lamps, high-end ballasts and switch-mode power supplies that use zero-voltage and zero-current transitions.The STx9NK60ZD is the first device built using a new high-voltage process technology known as SuperFREDMesh™. Thanks to this advanced technology that realizes a new carrier lifetime control process on the ST's basic High Voltage SuperMESH™ series, the device shows, along with optimal dynamic performance, optimized body diode reverse-recovery time (trr) and very soft recovery. All these features help reduce switching losses.

Devices built using the SuperFREDMesh technology also benefit from reduced on-resistance, Zener gate protection, high dv/dt capability and cost competitiveness.

The part handles 600V, a drain current of up to 7A and offers a typical RDS(on) of 0.85Ohm. The STF9NK60ZD handles up to 30W, while the STB9NK60ZD and STP9NK60ZD each handle up to 125W.

The parts are100% avalanche tested and are available in TO-220, TO-220FP and D2PAK packages.

US pricing is 0.80$US in quantities of 100k pieces. Further information is available at www.st.com/pmos

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