VoIP Technology Enters the Next Generation

August 3, 2004

InComm Holdings Corp., Inc., currently a privately held company offering unique global VoIP services, today announced that it has taken Voice Over Internet Protocol (VoIP) technology to the next level with the introduction of its Plug and Play VoIP Media Terminal Adapter.

InComm will offer customers an unprecedented combination of easy Plug & Play installation combined with cutting edge, enhanced calling features simply by using InComm's Media Terminal Adapter and a broadband connection. Customers can be assigned a virtual phone number, which can be used to receive calls anywhere in the world for the price of a local phone call. Additionally, calls between VoIP2 customers completely bypass the legacy telephone network and are offered free of charge as part of the monthly service fee regardless of where the customers are located. Friends and family members can speak to each other free of costly per-minute rates even when they live in different parts of the world.

Another key differentiator of the InComm Plug & Play Adapter is the "Smart Router(SM)." This router not only allows the device to share a broadband connection with a customer's computer, but also prioritizes voice traffic over data traffic to ensure superior quality service.

"Users can enjoy unlimited calling for under $20 per month as well as additional features such as voice mail, call waiting, call forwarding, missed call information, caller ID, and conference calling for one low flat fee," stated Jack Namer, InComm's chief technology officer. "Due to its feature-rich capabilities, InComm's service is a powerful second line alternative to the expensive charges of traditional phone companies. Additionally, because the adapter is Plug & Play, our product would be ideal for 'big box' electronic stores and department stores to integrate into their technology product inventory."

Other service providers currently offer portable VoIP hardware; however, in order for those products to provide service to the user they often require difficult installation procedures. InComm's adapter is ready to use in minutes, taking this complicated procedure out of the consumer's hands. Therefore, users can take the Adapter on the road with them and access InComm's services, such as a virtual phone number, anywhere in the world. For example, a user could call someone in the United States from overseas and avoid expensive overseas long-distance charges.

"We are aggressively researching, developing and implementing additional complementary add-on features, which will further enhance our VoIP technology," stated Namer. As InComm's VoIP technology continues to develop, the Company plans to seamlessly add new features, including Virtual Office, Follow-me "One Number," and Broadcast quality Video Streaming services, among others. "We plan to announce additional features in the near future," Namer added.

Explore further: Securities analysts' reports new technology slow adoption, study warns

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