Storms and Olympic Games from Space

August 13, 2004
Space Station Storm

The International Space Station offers a unique view of some of the week's biggest news events. Its cameras have captured video of the two major storms developing in the Gulf of Mexico and the Caribbean, as well as a view of the site of the 2004 Olympic games.

Space-based video of Tropical Storm Bonnie, Hurricane Charley and the city of Athens, Greece, is available this week during NASA TV Video File feeds. For information about NASA TV on the Internet, including a schedule of feeds, visit:
www.nasa.gov

Still imagery is available online at:
spaceflight.nasa.gov

The International Space Station Expedition 9 crewmembers, Gennady Padalka and Mike Fincke, captured the latest images as they passed 230 statute miles over the Earth.

NASA will continue to monitor the storms and release images and video as they become available.

NASA Television is available in the continental U.S. on AMC-6, Transponder 9C, C-Band, located at 72 degrees west longitude. The frequency is 3880.0 MHz. Polarization is vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz. In Alaska and Hawaii, NASA Television is available on AMC-7, Transponder 18C, C-Band, located at 137 degrees west longitude. Frequency is 4060.0 MHz. Polarization is vertical, and audio is monaural at 6.80 MHz.

Source: NASA

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