SONY DEVELOPS NEW HIGH DEFINITION VIDEO CREATION TECHNOLOGY

August 11, 2004
SONY DEVELOPS NEW HIGH DEFINITION VIDEO CREATION TECHNOLOGY

Sony Corporation announced today the development of the "Digital Reality Creation Multifunction v2 (DRC-MFv2)" controller chip, which evolved from the original "DRC" video processing technology that realizes the creation of real high-definition video. This new technology can project real texture and true high-resolution quality of a High Definition (HD) signal transmitted from a broadcaster or from video captured on a high definition video camera. DRC-MFv2 realizes the creation of extended definition video in a higher resolution quality.

"DRC" was developed in 1997 as a technology that changed a standard television signal format to a high-definition signal format, based on the concept of establishing a higher definition signal format from scratch. The foundation of this technology was based upon a goal to create a detailed video signal that reproduces high-resolution video through LSI processing. It was achieved by optimizing the correlating characteristics of standard television signal and high-definition signal.
By creating a real 4x dense signal that contained twice the amount of vertical and horizontal information found on a standard television signal, DRC realized the creation of truly high-resolution video with real textures.
The new "DRC-MFv2" video processing technology takes the pursuit of a reality in HD era to another level. It not only re-creates standard TV signal or various HD format signals to the full HDTV (H1902 x V1080) quality, but it also re-creates HDTV signal to higher quality video with gloss, textures and depth perception like real subject. This technology is based on Sony's unique algorithm calculates the optimal video output based upon the received video signal. (Chart-1)

This exclusive image-processing technology will be integrated into future models of Sony's WEGA TV series, making it possible for users to view and experience the vast potential of the high-definition era.

"DRC-MFv2" technology also realizes "Creation View" function that enables viewers to enlarge their favorite part of the video image, without losing the quality. Creating a maximum of 36 pixels for each 1 original pixel from the source signal, the DRC-MFv2 technology enables up to 3x3 high-quality zoom possible. Moreover, viewers can pan, tilt and select video images on TV from their viewpoint, just as if they were the camera person.
With the anticipation of more HD content to be available for home HD TV sets in the near future, Sony plans to extend the new "DRC-MFv2" technology beyond HD TV integration, and offer it as stand-alone application.

Source: Sony

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