One-Watt 900MHz Modems Simplify Long-Range WLAN Connectivity

August 5, 2004

Now available with one full watt of output power, AeroComm's ConnexLink(TM) packaged transceivers can talk over distances of 20 miles line-of-sight. Units can be set up in minutes for cable-free communication between industrial RS232/422/485 devices, providing reliable data transmissions of up to 115.2Kbps.

Their flexibility and price (under $290 per unit -- less than half the price of similarly specified modems) suit a variety of industrial and commercial applications:

-- Real-time inventory and change monitoring in vending machines and ATMs

-- Quick info upload to electronic signs and scoreboards

-- Timely information retrieval on kiosks and point-of-sale displays

-- Remote data collection from industrial loggers and monitors

-- Communication to personal and portable computers, handheld terminals

-- Printing or scanning in restaurants, grocery stores, warehouses

ConnexLinks are small and easily portable for use in mobile and temporary settings as well as for fixed installations. They can be used as direct cable replacements, requiring no special host software for communication. Optional drivers enable custom configurations based on the user's needs.

Any number of remote ConnexLinks can be set up in point-to-point or point-to-multipoint configurations, and unique networks can be co-located on site. A unique embedded protocol (RF232(TM)) manages over-the-air concerns, such as interference rejection, error detection, addressing, security, and link verification.

"Until now, anyone looking for affordable, long-range, plug-and-play wireless was limited to designed-in OEM modules or bulky expensive packaged radios," said Sean Dycus, commercial product manager of AeroComm. "Our new ConnexLink units make distant networking fast and efficient. Users simply attach mouse-sized radios to interconnect their terminals -- as far as 20 miles apart. This simple yet powerful solution can shorten development cycles, reduce software investment and decrease time to market for data-only portable and permanent terminals."

ConnexLinks operating in the 900MHz frequency band are approved for use in portable applications in the United States, Canada, Australia and South America. To suit the global marketplace, 2.4GHz modems are also available. Products can be purchased from AeroComm, Avnet, Mouser and premier distributors worldwide.

Source: AeroComm

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