$411,000 grant to fund robot-replacing technology

August 25, 2004

Florida Institute of Technology and Univeristy of Dayton collaborate on grant

The tables are being turned on robots. Once feared to be stealing jobs from people, now robots will have jobs taken from them. A project of Florida Tech and the University of Dayton, funded by a $411,000 National Science Foundation grant, will create a new technology to replace robots in many automated assembly operations.

Dr. Pierre Larochelle, Florida Tech associate professor of mechanical engineering, and University of Dayton professors will create the ability to design these novel machines.

"To reduce costs, assembly line designers try to keep robotic manipulations on the assembly line as simple as possible," said Larochelle. "Typically, the robots have six or more motors that allow them to perform an infinitely wide variety of motions; these motors make robots expensive and challenging to program."

In this new project, researchers will create mechanical systems to accomplish the same tasks, but with only one or two motors. This creates better reliability and "a cheaper, lower maintenance alternative to robots," said Larochelle.

"Our objective is to create the capability to design new and innovative devices for the spatial assembly tasks that robots are doing thousands of times a day," he said.

When completed, the project will result in significant contributions to the nation's automated manufacturing industries, providing a brand new tool to assembly line designers.

Source: Florida Institute of Technology

Explore further: Inspired by venus flytrap, researchers develop folding 'snap' geometry

Related Stories

Programming materials for better designs

August 12, 2015

We often think of the everyday materials we use to build our human world as static, but we should think again: MIT's Self-Assembly Lab programs such materials to transform themselves to handle tasks more simply and efficiently, ...

Robotic insect mimics nature's extreme moves

July 30, 2015

The concept of walking on water might sound supernatural, but in fact it is a quite natural phenomenon. Many small living creatures leverage water's surface tension to maneuver themselves around. One of the most complex maneuvers, ...

Rare form: Novel structures built from DNA emerge

July 20, 2015

DNA, the molecular foundation of life, has new tricks up its sleeve. The four bases from which it is composed snap together like jigsaw pieces and can be artificially manipulated to construct endlessly varied forms in two ...

How oversized atoms could help shrink

July 1, 2015

"Lab-on-a-chip" devices – which can carry out several laboratory functions on a single, micro-sized chip – are the result of a quiet scientific revolution over the past few years. For example, they enable doctors to make ...

Recommended for you

Image: Hubble sees a youthful cluster

August 31, 2015

Shown here in a new image taken with the Advanced Camera for Surveys (ACS) on board the NASA/ESA Hubble Space Telescope is the globular cluster NGC 1783. This is one of the biggest globular clusters in the Large Magellanic ...

Antibody-making bacteria promise drug development

August 31, 2015

Monoclonal antibodies, proteins that bind to and destroy foreign invaders in our bodies, routinely are used as therapeutic agents to fight a wide range of maladies including breast cancer, leukemia, asthma, arthritis, psoriasis, ...

0 comments

Please sign in to add a comment. Registration is free, and takes less than a minute. Read more

Click here to reset your password.
Sign in to get notified via email when new comments are made.