International Space Station Expedition 9 Science Operations Status Report

July 29, 2004

International Space Station Science Officer Mike Fincke and Commander Gennady Padalka are continuing an experiment that looks at the interactions between the crew and ground teams. The study involves a questionnaire on a laptop computer, which the crew and members of their ground support team complete once a week. The information gained will lead to improved training and in-flight support of future space crews.

NASA ISS Science Officer Mike Fincke and Commander Gennady Padalka continue their support of an experiment that looks at the interactions between the crew and the ground teams. This experiment involves a questionnaire on a laptop computer, which the crew and members of their ground support team complete once a week. The data is being used to examine issues involving tension, cohesion and leadership roles in both the crewmembers and their support team. The information gained will lead to improved training and in-flight support of future space crews.

As part of Fincke's Saturday Afternoon Science, he conducted another session of the Educational Payload Operations or EPO. This EPO activity demonstrated what crewmembers can observe about pollution and the environmental problems on Earth. Fincke showed the window where he observes the Earth, and described what types of pollution can be seen — such as air pollution in urban areas, smoke from wildfires, deforestation and strip mining. The activity was videotaped and will be used later in classrooms and NASA educational products. EPO is an education payload designed to support the NASA Mission to inspire the next generation of explorers.

NASA's payload operations team at the Marshall Center coordinates science activities on Space Station.

Source: NASA

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