Inactivate an Airborne Virus With...Plasma

July 28, 2004

Recently, new viral-based infectious diseases such as SARS (corona viruses) and avian influenza (orthomyxoviruses) have made their appearance, and cases that threaten human health are on the increase. In seeking new technologies for purifying the air, Sharp has systematically verified the efficacy of Plasmacluster IonsTM in deactivating harmful substances that are the cause of illnesses spread through the medium of the air.

Now, in collaboration with Director & Visiting Professor Tatsuo Suzuki PhD and Assistant Director Noritada Kobayashi PhD of the Kitasato Institute Medical Center Hospital, one of the world’s most prestigious viral research organizations, we have verified that Plasmacluster IonsTM inactivate the feline corona virus (FCoV), a member of the Coronaviridae (corona virus) family. The results demonstrated that 99.7% of the virus is rendered inactive within 40 minutes. In other words, we proved that Plasmacluster IonsTM work to destroy the virus and control its capacity to infect.

Theses results have now enabled us to demonstrate the efficacy of Plasmacluster IonsTM against three basic types of major pathogenic viruses that infect by aerosol transmission (inhalation).

Plasmacluster IonTM technology is Sharp's proprietary air purification technology in which large numbers of positive and negative ions are generated from airborne water and oxygen molecules and then released back into the air in large quantities. These ions form clusters around microparticles such as airborne mold, influenza viruses and mite allergens, and render them inactive through a chemical reaction. Sharp developed this air purification technology in 2000, and is working with leading academic research institutions around the world to verify its effectiveness. Based on the scientific data that emerges from this industry-academia collaboration, Sharp will develop and introduce new products to the market.

More details at sharp-world.com/corporate/news/040727.html

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