Elpida Memory's Expanded Line of 128 Megabit DDR SDRAM Devices Provide High Bandwidth for Digital Consumer Applications

July 21, 2004

0.11 micron, x16, DDR400 Devices are Ideal for Standard and High Definition TV

Elpida Memory, Inc (Elpida), Japan's leading global supplier of Dynamic Random Access Memory (DRAM), today announced its latest offering in the company's line of 0.11-micron, high-speed DRAM devices for use in digital consumer applications. The new devices are128 Megabit double data rate (DDR) SDRAMs with a x16-bit data path configuration and a maximum data rate of 400 Megabits per second per device, offering sufficient density and speed for digital consumer electronics applications such as set-top boxes, personal video recorders (PVR), and hybrid recorders. When mounted on a maximally-configured (64 Megabyte) memory, Elpida's 128 Megabit DDR SDRAM devices enable a data transfer rate of 3.2 Gigabytes per second, thereby meeting the requirements of not only SD (Standard Definition) digital television but also HD (High Definition) digital television.

"With the continued proliferation of high-performance digital consumer devices, there is a growing demand for DRAM that delivers the necessary speed and density for these consumer devices and their increasingly sophisticated functionality," said Jun Kitano, director of Technical Marketing for Elpida Memory (USA). "Our customers know that they can count on Elpida's proven device production and consistent support using its advanced 0.11-micron process to help them deliver successful consumer electronics products."

Elpida's Expanding Line of Digital Consumer DRAM Products
With the latest 128 Megabit DDR SDRAM devices, Elpida continues to augment its line of DRAMs optimized for digital consumer products. Included in this line are 64 Megabit, 128 Megabit and 256 Megabit densities with wide x16 or x32-bit data path (input/output) configurations. All densities are offered in single data rate (SDR) SDRAM architecture, and higher performance double data rate (DDR) devices are also available in a 128 Megabit density with x16 and x32 configurations.

The original press release can be found here.

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