June 30, 2004

Unique New Camcorder Offers Advanced Digital Video and Still Image Recording Technologies, Combined with Top-of-the-Line Features

Panasonic’s newest digital camcorder represents the perfect integration of digital video and still image recording technologies, and adds some of today’s most advanced, desirable features to the equation. Model PV-GS400 features three CCDs for exceptional color fidelity and outstanding low-light (12 lux) capability in video recording. In addition, the PV-GS400 integrates a high-quality, 4-megapixel still camera(1).

Advanced features include a high-performance Leica Dicomar lens, 12x optical zoom and 700x digital zoom2, optical image stabilization and much more.

The PV-GS400, available in August, boasts an MSRP* of $1499.95 ¾ a new breakthrough in pricing* for a 3CCD camcorder of this caliber.

“The new PV-GS400 is the only 3CCD digital camcorder to incorporate a 4-megapixel still camera ¾ the highest resolution of any consumer camcorder on the market,” said Rudolf Vitti, National Marketing Manager, Panasonic Optical Group. “For the first time, there’s a camcorder to meet the pro-sumer’s demand for the most advanced digital imaging technologies and top-of-the-line features for both video and still image recording.”

The PV-GS400 features the same type of sophisticated 3CCD imaging system used in Panasonic’s celebrated professional video cameras. Three 1/ 4.7” CCDs separately reproduce the red, green and blue color signals that compose an image to produce vivid, true-to-life pictures, even in low light conditions.

A high-performance Leica Dicomar lens renders images with a level of depth and expressiveness formerly found only with the finest film cameras.

Enhancing the unit’s powerful zoom abilities, Panasonic’s precision optical image stabilization automatically detects and compensates for hand movement ¾ especially important when zooming in to capture distant or fast-moving subjects or when shooting in low-light conditions.

Other advanced features include:

· Auto exposure controls; as well as a full set of manual controls, including iris (aperture), shutter speed and white balance
· 3.5-inch color LCD monitor
· Color viewfinder
· Software included to create MPEG4 high compression video for moving images that can be streamed on the Internet or sent as e-mail attachments
· Simultaneous motion video and 1-megapixel still image recording
· Pop-up flash
· SD Memory Card/MultiMediaCard slot
· IEEE 1394 interface
· USB interface/cable
· SD Card USB reader/writer
· Web cam functionality

(1) With Quad Density Pixel Distribution Technology
(2) As digital magnification increases, resolution decreases.

The original press release can be found here.

Explore further: Post-Betamax, the format wars continue in a digital world

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