Soft Matter

Soft Matter is a peer-reviewed scientific journal publishing original (primary) research and review articles on the generic science underpinning the properties and applications of soft matter. Soft Matter is published 48 times a year by the Royal Society of Chemistry. Liz Davies is the Editor of Soft Matter. Soft Matter was launched in 2005 and has a high impact factor of 4.869 which makes it top of its field. While the journal was initially published as 12 issues a year, as submissions increased, the journal switched in 2009 to 24 issues a year and 48 issues a year in 2012. Soft Matter publishes the following types of articles: Research Papers (original scientific work); Communications (original scientific work that is of an urgent nature); Reviews (critical appraisals of topical areas of research); Highlights (short review articles that single out important new developments and explain the significance of the work) ; Emerging Areas (short accounts of a potentially important and growing new field of research); Tutorial Reviews (an essential introduction to a particular area of soft matter); and Opinions (a personal, often speculative, viewpoint or hypothesis on a topic of current

Impact factor
4.457 (2010)
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Clues to foam formation could help find oil

Blowing bubbles in the backyard is one thing and quite another when searching for oil. That distinction is at the root of new research by Rice University scientists who describe in greater detail than ever ...

Oct 08, 2013 not rated yet 0 | with audio podcast

Milikelvins drive droplet evaporation

Evaporation is so common that everybody thinks it's a well understood phenomenon. Appearances can be, however, deceptive. Recently, a new, earlier not predicted mechanism of evaporation was discovered. Experiments ...

Jul 18, 2013 5 / 5 (2) 1

The nanostructure of edible fats

Researchers at DOE's Brookhaven are using the National Synchrotron Light Source (NSLS) to categorize the many facets of fat crystals. They've learned that the distribution and directionality of these crystal ...

Apr 26, 2013 5 / 5 (4) 0

Researchers develop printable lasers

(Phys.org)—A way of printing lasers using everyday inkjet technology has been created by scientists. The development has a wide range of possible applications, ranging from biomedical testing to laser arrays ...

Sep 19, 2012 4.9 / 5 (9) 1 | with audio podcast

'Bed of nails' material for clean surfaces

(Phys.org)—Scientists at the University of Twente's MESA+ Institute for Nanotechnology have developed a new material that is not only extremely water-repellent but also extremely oil-repellent. It contains ...

Sep 17, 2012 3 / 5 (5) 2