PLoS ONE

PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available. In 2006, the journal published 138 articles; in 2007, it published just over 1,200 articles; and in 2008, it

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)
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Examining new trends in citizen science

At the start of every year, most people will have made a list of New Year's resolutions. Some of the most common this year will be to get fit, adopt healthy eating habits and spend more time with the family. But have you ...

dateFeb 02, 2016 in Other
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New detection method for Goby invasion

Conventional methods of stock monitoring are unsuitable for certain fish species. For example, the infestation of an area with invasive Ponto-Caspian gobies cannot be identified in time by standard methods. Researchers at ...

dateJan 27, 2016 in Ecology
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Camels test positive for respiratory virus in Kenya

A new study has found that nearly half of camels in parts of Kenya have been infected by the virus that causes Middle East Respiratory Syndrome (MERS) and calls for further research into the role they might play in the transmission ...

dateOct 16, 2015 in Ecology
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Fractals patterns in a drummer's music

Fractal patterns are profoundly human – at least in music. This is one of the findings of a team headed by researchers from the Max Planck Institute for Dynamics and Self-Organization in Göttingen and Harvard University ...

dateAug 28, 2015 in Mathematics
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