PLoS ONE

PLoS ONE is an open access peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the Public Library of Science (PLoS) since 2006. It covers primary research from any discipline within science and medicine. All submissions go through an internal and external pre-publication peer review but are not excluded on the basis of lack of perceived importance or adherence to a scientific field. The PLoS ONE online platform has post-publication user discussion and rating features. PLoS ONE was launched in December 2006 as a beta version. It launched with Commenting and Note making functionality, and added the ability to rate articles in July 2007. In September 2007 the ability to leave "trackbacks" on articles was added. In August 2008 it moved from a weekly publication schedule to a daily one, publishing articles as soon as they became ready. In October 2008 PLoS ONE came out of "beta". Also in September 2009, as part of its "Article-Level Metrics" program, PLoS ONE made the full online usage data for every published article (HTML page views, PDF, and XML downloads) publicly available. In 2006, the journal published 138 articles; in 2007, it published just over 1,200 articles; and in 2008, it

Publisher
Public Library of Science
History
2006--present
Impact factor
4.411 (2010)
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A litmus test of fairness

For example, lay people think that the sickest patients and those on waiting lists should be treated first, while ethicists – and to some degree medical professionals – tend to have a different set of priorities. This ...

dateSep 19, 2016 in Social Sciences
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Trophy hunting of lions can conserve the species

One year after the worldwide controversy when an American dentist killed Cecil the Lion in Zimbabwe, the DICE team says hunting works but only when hunting companies are given long-term land management rights.

dateSep 22, 2016 in Ecology
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Scientists create a new way to categorize music

A team of scientists from McGill University, the University of Cambridge, and Stanford Graduate School of Business developed a new method of coding and categorizing music. They found that people's preference for these musical ...

dateMay 11, 2016 in Social Sciences
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Your friends have more friends than you do

No matter how smart and funny you think you are, those you follow on Twitter really do have a larger following than you. And the same holds true for Facebook. But there is no reason to feel badly about any of this, according ...

dateMay 18, 2016 in Social Sciences
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