Physics of Fluids

How the kettle got its whistle

(Phys.org) —Researchers have finally worked out where the noise that makes kettles whistle actually comes from – a problem which has puzzled scientists for more than 100 years.

dateOct 25, 2013 in Soft Matter
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How much can a mode-2 wave move?

Look out over the ocean and you might get the impression that it's a mass of water acting as a single entity. However, the world's oceans are made up of layers of different densities, called stratifications, with complex ...

dateMay 24, 2016 in Soft Matter
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Daffodils help inspire design of stable structures

In 1940, the Tacoma Narrows Bridge collapsed in dramatic fashion, twisting in the wind before it snapped and plunged into the water below. As wind blew across the span, the flow induced oscillating sideways forces that helped ...

dateMay 10, 2016 in Soft Matter
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Will raindrops stick to a spider web's threads?

If you go out after a rain, you may notice spider webs glistening with water droplets. The soggy webs resemble human-made meshes for fog collection: They both have thin fibers that collect water from droplets in the air.

dateApr 12, 2016 in Soft Matter
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Sharkskin actually increases drag

On an intuitive level, you'd expect a shark's skin to reduce drag. After all, the purpose of sharkskin-inspired riblets—the micro-grooved structures found in aircraft wings, wind turbine blades and Olympic-class swimsuits—is ...

dateMar 15, 2016 in Soft Matter
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