Physics of Fluids

How the kettle got its whistle

(Phys.org) —Researchers have finally worked out where the noise that makes kettles whistle actually comes from – a problem which has puzzled scientists for more than 100 years.

Oct 25, 2013
4.7 / 5 (38) 11 | with audio podcast

What makes flying snakes such gifted gliders?

Animal flight behavior is an exciting frontier for engineers to both apply knowledge of aerodynamics and to learn from nature's solutions to operating in the air. Flying snakes are particularly intriguing ...

Mar 04, 2014
4.4 / 5 (9) 1

Physicists working to cure 'dry eye' disease

The eye is an exquisitely sensitive system with many aspects that remain somewhat of a mystery—both in the laboratory and in the clinic. A U.S.-based team of mathematicians and optometrists is working to change this by ...

May 06, 2014
4.2 / 5 (9) 0

Mathematicians model heat flow in human tears

Mathematicians from the University of Delaware have created a new model of the fluid dynamics and heat flow in human tears. When people blink their eyes, a thin liquid film is spread across the surface of the eye.

Jun 05, 2012
5 / 5 (5) 2 | with audio podcast

Shifting winds in turbine arrays

Researchers modeling how changes in air flow patterns affect wind turbines' output power have found that the wind can supply energy from an unexpected direction: below.

Oct 22, 2013
5 / 5 (5) 0

How Earth's rotation affects vortices in nature

What do smoke rings, tornadoes and the Great Red Spot of Jupiter have in common? They are all examples of vortices, regions within a fluid (liquid, gas or plasma) where the flow spins around an imaginary straight or curved ...

Oct 15, 2013
3.4 / 5 (7) 4 | with audio podcast

Bats inspire 'micro air vehicle' designs

By exploring how creatures in nature are able to fly by flapping their wings, Virginia Tech researchers hope to apply that knowledge toward designing small flying vehicles known as "micro air vehicles" with ...

Feb 18, 2014
3.4 / 5 (7) 1

Sound increases the efficiency of boiling

Scientists at the Georgia Institute of Technology achieved a 17-percent increase in boiling efficiency by using an acoustic field to enhance heat transfer. The acoustic field does this by efficiently removing vapor bubbles ...

May 24, 2012
5 / 5 (4) 6