Physics of Fluids

How the kettle got its whistle

(Phys.org) —Researchers have finally worked out where the noise that makes kettles whistle actually comes from – a problem which has puzzled scientists for more than 100 years.

dateOct 25, 2013 in Soft Matter
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Wind farms perform best when the sun is out

When set up in groups, wind turbines in the front rows cast a wind shadow on those behind them, lowering their performance. These effects dissipate fastest under convective conditions, say EPFL researchers ...

dateMar 20, 2015 in General Physics
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Mathematicians model fluids at the mesoscale

When it comes to boiling water—or the phenomenon of applying heat to a liquid until it transitions to a gas—is there anything left for today's scientists to study? The surprising answer is, yes, quite ...

dateMar 06, 2015 in Soft Matter
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How Earth's rotation affects vortices in nature

What do smoke rings, tornadoes and the Great Red Spot of Jupiter have in common? They are all examples of vortices, regions within a fluid (liquid, gas or plasma) where the flow spins around an imaginary straight or curved ...

dateOct 15, 2013 in General Physics
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What makes flying snakes such gifted gliders?

Animal flight behavior is an exciting frontier for engineers to both apply knowledge of aerodynamics and to learn from nature's solutions to operating in the air. Flying snakes are particularly intriguing ...

dateMar 04, 2014 in Soft Matter
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Bats inspire 'micro air vehicle' designs

By exploring how creatures in nature are able to fly by flapping their wings, Virginia Tech researchers hope to apply that knowledge toward designing small flying vehicles known as "micro air vehicles" with ...

dateFeb 18, 2014 in General Physics
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