Physics of Fluids

Physics of Fluids is a peer-reviewed monthly scientific journal on fluid dynamics, published by the American Institute of Physics with cooperation by the American Physical Society's Division of Fluid Dynamics, since 1958. The focus of the journal is on the dynamics of fluids—gases, liquids and multiphase flows—and the journal contains original research resulting from theoretical, computational and experimental studies. Until 1988, the journal covered both fluid and plasma physics. From 1989 until 1993, the journal was split into two separate ones: Physics of Fluids A covered fluid dynamics, while Physics of Fluids B was on plasma physics. In 1994, Physics of Plasmas was split off and the fluid dynamics journal continued under its original name, Physics of Fluids. Since 1985 Physics of Fluids presents the Gallery of Fluid Motion, containing award-winning photographs, images and visual streaming media of fluid flow, as resulting from experiments and computations. The annual "François Naftali Frenkiel Award" was established by the American Physical Society in 1984 and rewards a young scientist who has published a paper—containing significant contributions to fluid dynamics—in this

Publisher
American Institute of Physics
Country
United States
History
1958--present
Impact factor
1.722 (2010)
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Why planes freeze

Pilots and safety officials worry about ice accumulating on the wings and tail of an aircraft flying during freezing rain. Abnormal ice buildup can disturb airflow to alter the physics of flight and lead to stalls, rolls ...

dateJun 21, 2016 in Condensed Matter
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Sharkskin actually increases drag

On an intuitive level, you'd expect a shark's skin to reduce drag. After all, the purpose of sharkskin-inspired riblets—the micro-grooved structures found in aircraft wings, wind turbine blades and Olympic-class swimsuits—is ...

dateMar 15, 2016 in Soft Matter
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Will raindrops stick to a spider web's threads?

If you go out after a rain, you may notice spider webs glistening with water droplets. The soggy webs resemble human-made meshes for fog collection: They both have thin fibers that collect water from droplets in the air.

dateApr 12, 2016 in Soft Matter
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