Physical Review E

Physical Review E: Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal, published monthly by the American Physical Society. The main field of interest is many-body phenomena. The Editor-in-Chief is Gene D. Sprouse. While original research content requires subscription, editorials, news, and other non-research content is openly accessible. Although the focus of this journal is many-body phenomena, the broad scope of the journal includes quantum chaos, soft matter physics, classical chaos, biological physics and granular materials. Also emphasized are statistical physics, equilibrium and transport properties of fluids, liquid crystals, complex fluids, polymers, chaos, fluid dynamics, plasma physics, classical physics, and computational physics. This journal began as "Physical Review" in 1893. In 1913 the American Physical Society took over "Physical Review". In 1970 "Physical Review" was subdivided into Physical Review A, B, C, and D. From 1990 until 1993 a process was underway which split the journal then entitled " Physical Review A: General Physics" into two journals. Hence, from 1993 until 2000, one of the split off journals became Physical

Publisher
American Physical Society
Country
United States
History
1993 to present
Impact factor
2.352 (2010)
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Researchers develop new model to study epidemics

For decades, scientists have been perfecting models of how contagions spread, but newly published research takes the first steps into building a model that includes the loop linking individual human behavior and the behavior ...

Nov 06, 2014
4.7 / 5 (3) 0

Even geckos can lose their grip

Not even geckos and spiders can sit upside down forever. Nanophysics makes sure of that. Mechanics researchers at Linköping University have demonstrated this in an article just published in Physical Review E. ...

Jul 09, 2014
5 / 5 (3) 0

Rethinking surface tension

(Phys.org) —If you've ever watched a drop of water form into a bead or a water strider scoot across a pond, you are familiar with a property of liquids called surface tension.

Aug 30, 2013
4.9 / 5 (7) 0 | with audio podcast

When fluid dynamics mimic quantum mechanics

In the early days of quantum physics, in an attempt to explain the wavelike behavior of quantum particles, the French physicist Louis de Broglie proposed what he called a "pilot wave" theory. According to ...

Jul 29, 2013
4.7 / 5 (34) 6 | with audio podcast

Biophysicists unravel secrets of genetic switch

When an invading bacterium or virus starts rummaging through the contents of a cell nucleus, using proteins like tiny hands to rearrange the host's DNA strands, it can alter the host's biological course. The invading proteins ...

Aug 30, 2012
5 / 5 (5) 0 | with audio podcast