Physical Review E

Physical Review E: Statistical, Nonlinear, and Soft Matter Physics is a peer-reviewed, scientific journal, published monthly by the American Physical Society. The main field of interest is many-body phenomena. The Editor-in-Chief is Gene D. Sprouse. While original research content requires subscription, editorials, news, and other non-research content is openly accessible. Although the focus of this journal is many-body phenomena, the broad scope of the journal includes quantum chaos, soft matter physics, classical chaos, biological physics and granular materials. Also emphasized are statistical physics, equilibrium and transport properties of fluids, liquid crystals, complex fluids, polymers, chaos, fluid dynamics, plasma physics, classical physics, and computational physics. This journal began as "Physical Review" in 1893. In 1913 the American Physical Society took over "Physical Review". In 1970 "Physical Review" was subdivided into Physical Review A, B, C, and D. From 1990 until 1993 a process was underway which split the journal then entitled " Physical Review A: General Physics" into two journals. Hence, from 1993 until 2000, one of the split off journals became Physical

Publisher
American Physical Society
Country
United States
History
1993 to present
Impact factor
2.352 (2010)
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Sonic booms in nerves and lipid membranes

(Phys.org)—Neurons might not be able to send signals as fast as electrons in wires or photons in fiber, but what if they can communicate using miniature sonic booms? That would be quite a revolutionary discovery. A group ...

dateJan 20, 2015 in General Physics report
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How to cut a vortex into slices

A lot of problems associated with the mixing of the liquid in the microchannels could be solved via proper organization of the inhomogeneous slip on the walls of these channels. This is the conclusion of a joint group of ...

dateJun 04, 2015 in General Physics
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Researchers develop new model to study epidemics

For decades, scientists have been perfecting models of how contagions spread, but newly published research takes the first steps into building a model that includes the loop linking individual human behavior and the behavior ...

dateNov 06, 2014 in Mathematics
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