Nature Methods

Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world s most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts.

Impact factor
20.717 (2010)
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First sensor for 'crowd control' in cells

University of Groningen scientists have developed a molecular sensor to measure 'crowding' in cells, which reflects the concentration of macromolecules present. The sensor provides quantitative information on the concentration ...

dateFeb 02, 2015 in Biochemistry
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Cell imaging gets colorful

The detection and imaging of protein-protein interactions in live cells just got a lot more colourful, thanks to a new technology developed by University of Alberta chemist Dr. Robert E. Campbell and his team.

dateJan 26, 2015 in Biochemistry
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Turning point of a lifetime

For the first time, scientists can observe the first two to three days of a mouse embryo's life, as it develops from a fertilised egg up to the stage when it would implant in its mother's uterus, thanks to a new light sheet ...

dateDec 15, 2015 in Cell & Microbiology
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Watching the ribosome at work

A new statistical method could help to clarify the function of unknown genes. A research team under Uwe Ohler of the Berlin Institute for Medical Systems Biology (BIMSB) at the Max Delbrück Center for Molecular Medicine ...

dateDec 18, 2015 in Cell & Microbiology
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