Nature Methods

Nature, first published on 4 November 1869, is ranked the world s most cited interdisciplinary scientific journal by the Science Edition of the 2010 Journal Citation Reports. Most scientific journals are now highly specialized, and Nature is among the few journals (the other weekly journals Science and Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences are also prominent examples) that still publish original research articles across a wide range of scientific fields. There are many fields of scientific research in which important new advances and original research are published as either articles or letters in Nature. Research scientists are the primary audience for the journal, but summaries and accompanying articles are intended to make many of the most important papers understandable to scientists in other fields and the educated general public. Towards the front of each issue are editorials, news and feature articles on issues of general interest to scientists, including current affairs, science funding, business, scientific ethics and research breakthroughs. There are also sections on books and arts.

Impact factor
20.717 (2010)
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Cell imaging gets colorful

The detection and imaging of protein-protein interactions in live cells just got a lot more colourful, thanks to a new technology developed by University of Alberta chemist Dr. Robert E. Campbell and his team.

dateJan 26, 2015 in Biochemistry
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Mysteries of 'molecular machines' revealed

"Inside each cell in our bodies and inside every bacterium and virus are tiny but complex protein molecules that synthesize chemicals, replicate genetic material, turn each other on and off, and transport chemicals across ...

dateDec 22, 2014 in Cell & Microbiology
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End of CRISPR-CAS9 controversy

The IBS research team (Center for Genome Engineering) has successfully confirmed that CRISPR-Cas9 has accurate on-target effects in human cells, through joint research with the Seoul National University College of Medicine ...

dateFeb 10, 2015 in Cell & Microbiology
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A greasy way to take better protein snapshots

Thanks to research performed at RIKEN's SACLA X-ray free electron laser facility in Japan, the dream of analyzing the structure of large, hard-to-crystallize proteins and other bio molecules has come one step closer to reality. ...

dateNov 10, 2014 in Materials Science
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