Nano Letters

Nano Letters is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Chemical Society. It was established in January 2001. The two editors-in-chief are A. Paul Alivisatos (University of California, Berkeley) and Charles M. Lieber (Harvard University). The 2010 impact factor for Nano Letters is 12.219, according to the Journal Citation Reports. The focus of the journal is rapid dissemination of selected elements regarding fundamental, original research reports on all topics related to the theory and practice of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their subdisciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological phenomena related to nanoscience and nanotechnology are part of this focus. Furthermore nanoscale materials science is also included, focusing on processes and applications of structures at this size. Subject coverage encompasses the following: Materials that are synthesized and processed by physical, chemical, and biological methods. The classes of these materials are organic, inorganic, and hybrid. Furthermore, these processes are subjects of modeling and simulation. Specifically these process range from synthesis to assembly, along with relevant interactions. Also of

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2001–present
Impact factor
12.219 (2010)
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Graphene multiplies the power of light

Could graphene turn light to electricity? Scientists have shown that graphene can convert a single photon into multiple electrons, showing much promise for future photovoltaic devices.

dateJan 19, 2015 in Nanophysics
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Precision growth of light-emitting nanowires

A novel approach to growing nanowires promises a new means of control over their light-emitting and electronic properties. In a recent issue of Nano Letters, scientists from the U.S. Department of Energy's Lawrence Berkeley ...

dateFeb 06, 2015 in Nanophysics
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Future solar cells may be made of wood

(Phys.org) —A new kind of paper that is made of wood fibers yet is 96% transparent could be a revolutionary material for next-generation solar cells. Coming from plants, the paper is inexpensive and more environmentally ...

dateJan 23, 2014 in Nanophysics feature
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