Nano Letters

Nano Letters is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Chemical Society. It was established in January 2001. The two editors-in-chief are A. Paul Alivisatos (University of California, Berkeley) and Charles M. Lieber (Harvard University). The 2010 impact factor for Nano Letters is 12.219, according to the Journal Citation Reports. The focus of the journal is rapid dissemination of selected elements regarding fundamental, original research reports on all topics related to the theory and practice of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their subdisciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological phenomena related to nanoscience and nanotechnology are part of this focus. Furthermore nanoscale materials science is also included, focusing on processes and applications of structures at this size. Subject coverage encompasses the following: Materials that are synthesized and processed by physical, chemical, and biological methods. The classes of these materials are organic, inorganic, and hybrid. Furthermore, these processes are subjects of modeling and simulation. Specifically these process range from synthesis to assembly, along with relevant interactions. Also of

American Chemical Society
United States
Impact factor
12.219 (2010)
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

CLAIRE brings electron microscopy to soft materials

Soft matter encompasses a broad swath of materials, including liquids, polymers, gels, foam and - most importantly - biomolecules. At the heart of soft materials, governing their overall properties and capabilities, are the ...

dateMay 14, 2015 in Nanophysics
shares138 comments 0

Phagraphene, a relative of graphene, discovered

A group of scientists from Russia, the USA and China have predicted the existence of a new two-dimensional carbon material via computer generated simulation, a "patchwork" analogue of graphene called phagraphene. The results ...

dateSep 03, 2015 in Nanomaterials
shares145 comments 0

Entering the strange world of ultra-cold chemistry

Researchers at the Georgia Institute of Technology have received a $900,000 grant from the U.S. Air Force Office of Scientific Research (AFOSR) to study the unusual chemical and physical properties of atoms and molecules ...

dateNov 02, 2015 in Other
shares21 comments 0