Nano Letters

Nano Letters is a monthly peer-reviewed scientific journal published by the American Chemical Society. It was established in January 2001. The two editors-in-chief are A. Paul Alivisatos (University of California, Berkeley) and Charles M. Lieber (Harvard University). The 2010 impact factor for Nano Letters is 12.219, according to the Journal Citation Reports. The focus of the journal is rapid dissemination of selected elements regarding fundamental, original research reports on all topics related to the theory and practice of nanoscience and nanotechnology and their subdisciplines. Physical, chemical, and biological phenomena related to nanoscience and nanotechnology are part of this focus. Furthermore nanoscale materials science is also included, focusing on processes and applications of structures at this size. Subject coverage encompasses the following: Materials that are synthesized and processed by physical, chemical, and biological methods. The classes of these materials are organic, inorganic, and hybrid. Furthermore, these processes are subjects of modeling and simulation. Specifically these process range from synthesis to assembly, along with relevant interactions. Also of

Publisher
American Chemical Society
Country
United States
History
2001–present
Impact factor
12.219 (2010)
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Superconducting circuits, simplified

Computer chips with superconducting circuits—circuits with zero electrical resistance—would be 50 to 100 times as energy-efficient as today's chips, an attractive trait given the increasing power consumption ...

Oct 17, 2014
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Twisted graphene chills out

(Phys.org) —When two sheets of graphene are stacked in a special way, it is possible to cool down the graphene with a laser instead of heating it up, University of Manchester researchers have shown.

Sep 17, 2014
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Researchers create world's largest DNA origami

Researchers from North Carolina State University, Duke University and the University of Copenhagen have created the world's largest DNA origami, which are nanoscale constructions with applications ranging ...

Sep 11, 2014
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Breakthrough for carbon nanotube solar cells

Lighter, more flexible, and cheaper than conventional solar-cell materials, carbon nanotubes (CNTs) have long shown promise for photovoltaics. But research stalled when CNTs proved to be inefficient, converting ...

Sep 03, 2014
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