Journal of Biological Chemistry

The Journal of Biological Chemistry (JBC) is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that was established in 1905. Since 1925 it is published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. It covers research in any area of biochemistry or molecular biology. The editor-in-chief is Herbert Tabor. All its articles are available free one year after publication. In press articles are available free on its website immediately after acceptance. The journal was established in 1905 by John Jacob Abel and Christian Archibald Herter, who also served as the first editors; the first issue appeared in October 1905. The location of the journal s editorial offices has included Cornell Medical College (until 1937), Yale University (1937–1958), Harvard University (1958–1967), and New York (from 1967). The journal is currently published by the American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (ASBMB) at the ASBMB offices in Rockville, Maryland. The following individuals have served as editors-in-chief: The editors of the Journal of Biological Chemistry have criticized the modern reliance upon the impact factor for ranking journals, noting that review articles, commentaries,

American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology
United States
Impact factor
5.328 (2010)
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Using microbes to clean up oil spills

Catherine Drennan, a professor of chemistry and biology, likes to wax poetic about the complex chemistry of microbes. "I think they're elegant and beautiful," she says. Of course, she also sees their practical applications. ...

dateOct 20, 2015 in Biochemistry
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MicroRNAs are digested, not absorbed

There has been a lot of controversy in recent years over the issue of whether exogenous microRNA molecules can be absorbed from food and even have a physiological effect. A new study by ETH professor Markus Stoffel using ...

dateSep 08, 2015 in Biochemistry
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Two mutations are better than one

Two wrongs don't make a right, but in the case of genetic mutations, having two mutations in the same gene could be better than having either one individually. Recent research by biologists at San Diego State University found ...

dateOct 26, 2015 in Biotechnology
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