Icarus is a premier scientific journal dedicated to the field of planetary science. It is published under the auspices of the American Astronomical Society s Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS). The longtime publisher was Academic Press, which is now part of Elsevier. The journal contains articles discussing the results of new research on astronomy, geology, meteorology, physics, chemistry, biology, and other scientific aspects of the Solar System or extrasolar systems. The journal was founded in 1962, and became affiliated with the DPS in 1974. The late Carl Sagan served as editor of the journal from 1968 to 1979. He was succeeded by Joseph A. Burns (1980–1997) and Philip D. Nicholson (1998–present). The journal is named for the mythical Icarus, and the frontispiece of every issue contains an extended quotation from Sir Arthur Eddington equating Icarus adventurousness with the scientific investigator who "strains his theories to the breaking-point till the weak joints gape."

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Shining a light on the aurora of Mars

ESA's Mars Express has shed new light on the Red Planet's rare ultraviolet aurora by combining for the first time remote observations with in situ measurements of electrons hitting the atmosphere.

dateNov 05, 2015 in Space Exploration
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'Bathtub rings' suggest Titan's dynamic seas

Saturn's moon, Titan, is the only object in the Solar System other than Earth known to have liquid on its surface. While most of the lakes are found around the poles, the dry regions near the equator contain signs of evaporated ...

dateJul 28, 2015 in Space Exploration
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Dust storms on Mars

In the 1870's astronomers first noted the presence of yellow clouds on the surface of Mars and suggested they were caused by windblown dust. Today, dust storms on Mars are well known and those that display visible structures ...

dateAug 24, 2015 in Space Exploration
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A second minor planet may possess Saturn-like rings

There are only five bodies in our solar system that are known to bear rings. The most obvious is the planet Saturn; to a lesser extent, rings of gas and dust also encircle Jupiter, Uranus, and Neptune. The fifth member of ...

dateMar 16, 2015 in Astronomy
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What kind of life would we find on Titan?

Could there be life on Saturn's large moon Titan? Asking the question forces astrobiologists and chemists to think carefully and creatively about the chemistry of life, and how it might be different on other worlds than it ...

dateOct 05, 2015 in Space Exploration
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