Geophysical Research Letters

Geophysical Research Letters is a semi-monthly peer reviewed scientific journal published by the American Geophysical Union that was established in 1974. The editor-in-chief is Eric Calais (Purdue University). The stated purpose of Geophysical Research Letters is rapid publication of conscise research reports that may significantly influence one or more American Geophysical Union disciplines. These particular geoscience disciplines are atmospheric sciences, solid earth, space sciences, ocean sciences, hydrology, land surface processes, and the cryosphere. GRL also publishes twelve invited reviews that cover advances achieved during the past two or three years. The target readership is the earth science community, the broader scientific community, and the general public. This journal is indexed in the following databases: According to the Journal Citation Reports, the journal has a 2010 impact factor of 3.505, ranking it 12th out of 165 journals in the category "Geosciences, Multidisciplinary". Geophysical Research Letters was also the 5th most cited publication on climate change between 1999 and 2009.

Publisher
American Geophysical Union
Country
United States
History
1974—present
Impact factor
3.505 (2010)
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The ocean's hidden waves show their power

Their effect on the surface of the ocean is negligible, producing a rise of just inches that is virtually imperceptible on a turbulent sea. But internal waves, which are hidden entirely within the ocean, can tower hundreds ...

dateJan 08, 2014 in Earth Sciences
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Lakes discovered beneath Greenland ice sheet

The study, published in Geophysical Research Letters, discovered two subglacial lakes 800 metres below the Greenland Ice Sheet. The two lakes are each roughly 8-10 km2, and at one point may have been up to three times larger ...

dateNov 27, 2013 in Earth Sciences
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Study shows unprecedented warmth in Arctic

(Phys.org) —The heat is on, at least in the Arctic. Average summer temperatures in the Eastern Canadian Arctic during the last 100 years are higher now than during any century in the past 44,000 years and perhaps as long ...

dateOct 24, 2013 in Earth Sciences
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