Current Biology

Current Biology is a scientific journal that covers all areas of biology, especially molecular biology, cell biology, genetics, neurobiology, ecology and evolutionary biology. The journal is published twice a month and includes peer-reviewed research articles, various types of review articles, as well as an editorial magazine section. Current Biology was founded in 1991 by the Current Science group, acquired by Elsevier in 1998 and has since 2001 been part of Cell Press, a subdivision of Elsevier.

Publisher
Cell Press
Country
United States
History
1991–present
Impact factor
10.777 (2008)
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The winner doesn't always take all

Theoretically predicted and now demonstrated experimentally for the first time using soil bacteria: weaker organisms can prevail against stronger ones—if they are superior in number. This acts as a driving mechanism in ...

dateJun 11, 2015 in Cell & Microbiology
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Evolving a bigger brain with human DNA

The size of the human brain expanded dramatically during the course of evolution, imparting us with unique capabilities to use abstract language and do complex math. But how did the human brain get larger than that of our ...

dateFeb 19, 2015 in Biotechnology
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How to make trees grow bigger and quicker

Scientists at The University of Manchester have discovered a way to make trees grow bigger and faster, which could increase supplies of renewable resources and help trees cope with the effects of climate change.

dateApr 16, 2015 in Biotechnology
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Why slimy cheats don't win

Darwin's evolutionary theory predicts survival of the fittest. So why do different survival tactics co-exist, if evolution should always favour the winning strategy?

dateMar 31, 2015 in Evolution
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Hormones that guide root growth rates revealed

A plant's roots grow and spread into the soil, taking up necessary water and minerals. The tip of a plant's root is a place of active cell division followed by cell elongation, with different zones dedicated to different ...

dateApr 09, 2015 in Biotechnology
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