Conservation Biology

Conservation biology is the scientific study of the nature and status of Earth s biodiversity with the aim of protecting species, their habitats, and ecosystems from excessive rates of extinction. It is an interdisciplinary subject drawing on sciences, economics, and the practice of natural resource management. The term conservation biology was introduced as the title of a conference held at the University of California, San Diego in La Jolla, California in 1978 organized by biologists Bruce Wilcox and Michael E. Soulé. The meeting was prompted by the concern among scientists over tropical deforestation, disappearing species, eroding genetic diversity within species. The conference and proceedings that resulted sought to bridge a gap existing at the time between theory in ecology and population biology on the one hand and conservation policy and practice on the other. Conservation biology and the concept of biological diversity (biodiversity) emerged together, helping crystallize the modern era of conservation science and policy. The rapid decline of established biological systems around the world means that conservation biology is often referred to as a "Discipline with a

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MPA fails to protect sharks and rays

New research led by researchers at the University of Victoria raises serious concerns about the ability of marine protected areas (MPAs) to effectively protect wide-ranging iconic species, such as sharks and rays.

dateMar 24, 2015 in Ecology
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Conserving for nature's sake or our own?

The value of nature in conservation may seem simple, straightforward and fundamental. Yet a persistent question arises: Should we conserve nature only for humans or also for its own sake as well?

dateFeb 20, 2015 in Ecology
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New methods can protect animals during relocation

As Arizona continues to see development into formerly rural areas, additional research is emerging to help protect wildlife species. Because the state is home to a dozen rattlesnake species, understanding ...

dateFeb 02, 2015 in Ecology
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To save the birds, look to the fish

Birds that dive for fish while wintering in the Salish Sea, located between British Columbia and Washington, are more likely to be in decline than nondiving birds with less specialized diets, according to ...

dateOct 17, 2014 in Ecology
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