Biomaterials

Biomaterials is an international journal covering the science and clinical application of biomaterials. A biomaterial is now defined as a substance that has been engineered to take a form which, alone or as part of a complex system, is used to direct, by control of interactions with components of living systems, the course of any therapeutic or diagnostic procedure. It is the aim of the journal to provide a peer-reviewed forum for the publication of original papers and authoritative review and opinion papers dealing with the most important issues facing the use of biomaterials in clinical practice. The scope of the journal covers the wide range of physical, biological and chemical sciences that underpin the design of biomaterials and the clinical disciplines in which they are used. These sciences include polymer synthesis and characterization, drug and gene vector design, the biology of the host response, immunology and toxicology and self assembly at the nanoscale. Clinical applications include the therapies of medical technology and regenerative medicine in all clinical disciplines, and diagnostic systems that reply on innovative contrast and sensing agents. The journal is relevant to areas such as cancer diagnosis and therapy, implantable devices, drug delivery systems, gene vectors, bionanotechnology and tissue engineering.

Impact factor
7.404 (2011)
Some content from Wikipedia, licensed under CC BY-SA

Gene transfer optimization

Controlled gene transfer into different target cells by means of specific surface markers is significantly more efficient than gene transfer without this assistance. Gene therapies using lentiviral transfer of genetic information ...

Mar 04, 2014 not rated yet 0

A microchip for metastasis

Nearly 70 percent of patients with advanced breast cancer experience skeletal metastasis, in which cancer cells migrate from a primary tumor into bone—a painful development that can cause fractures and ...

Feb 06, 2014 5 / 5 (6) 0 | with audio podcast

A bio patch that can regrow bone

Researchers at the University of Iowa have created a bio patch to regenerate missing or damaged bone by putting DNA into a nano-sized particle that delivers bone-producing instructions directly into cells.

Nov 07, 2013 5 / 5 (6) 0 | with audio podcast

Kryptonite for cancer cells

(Phys.org) —Every available cancer drug is susceptible to resistance, according to Mansoor Amiji, Distinguished Professor and chair of the Department of Pharmaceutical Sciences. Tumors grow more quickly ...

Mar 19, 2013 5 / 5 (5) 1