Astrophysical Journal

Dark matter guides growth of supermassive black holes

Every massive galaxy has a black hole at its center, and the heftier the galaxy, the bigger its black hole. But why are the two related? After all, the black hole is millions of times smaller and less massive than its home ...

dateFeb 18, 2015 in Astronomy
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Exploded star blooms like a cosmic flower

Because the debris fields of exploded stars, known as supernova remnants, are very hot, energetic, and glow brightly in X-ray light, NASA's Chandra X-ray Observatory has proven to be a valuable tool in studying them. The ...

dateFeb 12, 2015 in Astronomy
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Mismatched twin stars spotted in the delivery room

The majority of stars in our galaxy come in pairs. In particular, the most massive stars usually have a companion. These fraternal twins tend to be somewhat equal partners when it comes to mass - but not always. In a quest ...

dateFeb 12, 2015 in Astronomy
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Astronomers find unexpected 'storm' at galaxy's core

Astronomers using the National Science Foundation's Very Large Array (VLA) found surprisingly energetic activity in what they otherwise considered a "boring" galaxy, and their discovery provides important insight on how supermassive ...

dateFeb 11, 2015 in Astronomy
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Black hole chokes on a swallowed star

A five-year analysis of an event captured by a tiny telescope at McDonald Observatory and followed up by telescopes on the ground and in space has led astronomers to believe they witnessed a giant black hole tear apart a ...

dateJan 26, 2015 in Astronomy
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Telescope to seek dust where other Earths may lie

The NASA-funded Large Binocular Telescope Interferometer, or LBTI, has completed its first study of dust in the "habitable zone" around a star, opening a new door to finding planets like Earth. Dust is a natural byproduct ...

dateJan 22, 2015 in Astronomy
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Magnetic fields help in formation of massive stars

Magnetic fields in massive dark clouds are strong enough to support the regions against collapse due to their own gravity. A study lead by researchers at the Max Planck Institute for Radio Astronomy in Bonn has now shown ...

dateJan 21, 2015 in Astronomy
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