Astrophysical Journal

Simulations reveal an unusual death for ancient stars

(Phys.org) —Certain primordial stars—those 55,000 and 56,000 times the mass of our Sun, or solar masses—may have died unusually. In death, these objects—among the Universe's first-generation of stars—would ...

Sep 29, 2014
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The spectra of white dwarf stars

Yesterday I talked about the Higgs, and how its discovery has led to a flurry of articles about how it might apply to astrophysics. So today here's another example, and this one's interesting because it's ...

Oct 09, 2014
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The difficulties of cataloging dark nebulae

E. E. Barnard is an astronomer perhaps best known for measuring the proper motion of a faint red dwarf about six light years away, now known as Barnard's star. But Barnard was also a pioneer of astrophotography, ...

Oct 06, 2014
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Most stars are born in clusters, some leave 'home'

New modeling studies from Carnegie's Alan Boss demonstrate that most of the stars we see were formed when unstable clusters of newly formed protostars broke up. These protostars are born out of rotating clouds ...

Sep 24, 2014
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Infant solar system shows signs of windy weather

Astronomers using the Atacama Large Millimeter/submillimeter Array (ALMA) have observed what may be the first-ever signs of windy weather around a T Tauri star, an infant analog of our own Sun. This may help ...

Sep 22, 2014
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The origin of Uranus and Neptune elucidated?

A team of French-American researchers led by the UTINAM Institute (CNRS/Université de Franche-Comté) has just proposed a solution to the problematic chemical composition of Uranus and Neptune, thus providing ...

Sep 24, 2014
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The frequency of high-energy gamma ray bursts

In the 1960s a series of satellites were built as part of Project Vela.  Project Vela was intended to detect violations of the 1963 ban on above ground testing of nuclear weapons.  The Vela satellites were ...

Sep 22, 2014
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