Angewandte Chemie

Angewandte Chemie is a weekly peer-reviewed scientific journal that covers all aspects of chemistry. Its impact factor was 12.730 in 2010, the highest value for a chemistry-specific journal that publishes original research. It is a journal of the German Chemical Society and is published by Wiley-VCH. Besides original research in the form of short communications, the journal contains review-type articles (reviews, minireviews, essays, highlights), and a magazine section (news, obituaries, book reviews, conference reports). Colloquially, the journal is simply called "Angewandte". "Angewandte Chemie" is German for "applied chemistry", although this translation no longer accurately describes the scope of the journal. The journal appears in two editions with separate volume and page numbering: a German edition, Angewandte Chemie (ISSN 0044-8249 (print), ISSN 1521-3757 (online)), with the magazine and review sections as well as some original research in German, and a fully English-language edition, Angewandte Chemie International Edition (ISSN 1433-7851 (print), ISSN 1521-3773 (online)).

Publisher
John Wiley & Sons Wiley-VCH
Country
Germany
History
1887–present (in German), 1962–present (in English)
Impact factor
12.730 (2010)
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Fighting the gram-negatives

Many microorganisms produce secondary natural products, the potential antibioticeffects of which are extensively investigated. German scientists have now examined a class of quinone-like substancescontaining an additional ...

dateOct 27, 2016 in Biochemistry
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Non-metal catalyst splits hydrogen molecule

Hydrogen (H2) is an extremely simple molecule and yet a valuable raw material which as a result of the development of sophisticated catalysts is becoming more and more important. In industry and commerce, applications range ...

dateOct 21, 2016 in Materials Science
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Sensor detects spoiled meat

MIT chemists have devised an inexpensive, portable sensor that can detect gases emitted by rotting meat, allowing consumers to determine whether the meat in their grocery store or refrigerator is safe to eat.

dateApr 15, 2015 in Analytical Chemistry
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