rss Last update Laser scientists' new research could improve the treatment of asthma sufferers, Nov 13, 2014

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Healthy fractions of oats efficiently recovered

In his PhD thesis, Juhani Sibakov, MSc (Tech) from VTT Technical Research Centre of Finland developed methods to broaden the use of oats in, for example, snacks and beverages. Fractions with 56% beta-glucan ...

Oct 27, 2014
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Lab sleuths help art world uncover fakes

Dressed in an immaculate white lab coat, Sandra Mottaz stares intently through a stereo microscope at a bold-coloured painting purportedly by French master Fernand Leger, searching for signs of forgery.

Oct 08, 2014
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Have our bodies held the key to new antibiotics all along?

As the threat of antibiotic resistance grows, scientists are turning to the human body and the trillion or so bacteria that have colonized us—collectively called our microbiota—for new clues to fighting microbial infections. ...

Oct 01, 2014
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Science to the rescue of art

Vincent van Gogh's "Sunflowers" are losing their yellow cheer and the unsettling apricot horizon in Edvard Munch's "The Scream" is turning a dull ivory.

Sep 14, 2014
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Technology to preserve the pleasant smell of coffee

One of the most popular German coffee varieties – Dallmayr Prodomo – is roasted, ground, and packaged in Berlin. To maintain the high quality standard, the producer seeks to ensure that the production ...

Sep 05, 2014
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A fix to our cell-phone waste problem?

When it comes to cell phones, the world is stunningly wasteful. Customers will buy more than 1.8 billion new ones by the end of this year only to abandon almost half of them to drawers, and they'll recycle a mere 3 percent ...

Sep 03, 2014
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The chemistry of beer and coffee

University of Alabama at Birmingham professor Tracy Hamilton, Ph.D., is applying his chemistry expertise to two popular beverages: beer and coffee.

Sep 01, 2014
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How to prevent organic food fraud

A growing number of consumers are willing to pay a premium for fruits, vegetables and other foods labelled "organic", but whether they're getting what the label claims is another matter. Now scientists studying ...

Aug 27, 2014
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Rice chemist wins 'Nobel Prize of Cyprus'

Rice University organic chemist K.C. Nicolaou has earned three prestigious international honors, including the Nemitsas Prize, the highest honor a Cypriot scientist can receive and one of the most prestigious ...

Aug 21, 2014
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Coffee withdrawal

Coffee: It leaves some people feeling fit and refreshed; in others, it makes their heart race. Scientists have developed several decaffeination processes to allow even people who react badly to caffeine to ...

Aug 14, 2014
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Bamboo pale Ale beer from modern craft brewery

In order to be a novel alternative in the industry of microbreweries in Mexico, a young entrepreneur opted for the manufacture and marketing of a beer made from bamboo, first of its kind in the country and ...

Keeping filler ingredients out of your cup of coffee

Coffee drinkers beware: Surprise ingredients that are neither sweet nor flavorful may be hiding in your coffee, and growing coffee shortages may increase the chance of having these fillers in your cup of ...

A game changer to boost literacy and maths skills

How polymer banknotes were invented

Tool kit for ocean health

How science sizzles in the modern kitchen

Some of the world's finest chemists don't wear lab coats. Instead, they don aprons and toques, and masterfully meld their passion for cooking with a growing awareness of the science behind the culinary arts. The results are ...

Figuring out methane's role in the climate puzzle

The U.S. may be on the verge of an economy driven by methane, the primary component of natural gas, which burns cleaner than coal and is undergoing a production boom. It has poised the country as a top fuel producer globally, ...

Bioelectronics could lead to a new class of medicine

Imagine having tiny electronics implanted somewhere in your body that can regulate nerve signals and make symptoms of various disorders go away. That's the vision of the field of bioelectronic medicine—the emerging discipline ...

How physicians are adapting to payment reform

A colorful gathering of middle-aged stars

MDMA godfather Alexander Shulgin's legacy

The first time ecstasy impinged on the public consciousness in Britain was in November 1995, when an 18-year old Essex schoolgirl named Leah Betts died a few days after taking a tablet at a birthday party. The cause of her death was drink ...

Brain folding

ENIAC panels go on display at Oklahoma museum

NASA seeks comments on possible airship challenge

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